Vikings Injuries: Fusco practicing, Diggs out

Vikings guard Brandon Fusco returned to practice Monday, his first since suffering a concussion Oct. 9 against Houston. Fusco was lost for the game on the first series against the Texans. Minnesota was back at practice on Monday following a bye week.


Vikings center Joe Berger, left, and guard Brandon Fusco defending their quarterback, in the fourth quarter, as the Minnesota Vikings beat the Chicago Bears 23-20 at Soldier Field in Chicago on November 1, 2015. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

Sitting out Monday were wide receivers Stefon Diggs (hamstring) and Jarius Wright (undisclosed), and tight end MyCole Pruitt, who suffered a knee injury against the Texans. Diggs sat out against Houston and hasn’t practiced since playing in an Oct. 3 game against the New York Giants.

The Vikings’ most recent practice was Tuesday. Also returning after missing that workout:  linebacker Anthony Barr (undisclosed) and tight end Rhett Ellison, who missed the game against Houston with a knee injury.

Practice squad guard Isame Faciane did not practice. He was arrested last Wednesday in St. Louis Park on suspicion of drunken driving.

Quarterback Taylor Heinicke was eligible to practice Monday after being placed on the reserve non-football injury list Sept. 3. Heinicke did not participate, but a source said Heinicke is “100 percent” and expected to practice on Wednesday.

Heinicke suffered a torn tendon in his left foot in July, the result, he said, of his foot going through a window when he was locked out of his home in Atlanta. When Heinicke returns, the Vikings will have 21 days to decide whether to place him on the 53-man roster or leave him on the non-football injury list.

Wednesday will be a heavier practice day, and if Heinicke goes then, it would give the Vikings perhaps a heavier additional day of practice at the end to make a decision. The source expects Minnesota, which has quarterbacks Sam Bradford and Shaun Hill on the active roster, and Joel Stave on the practice squad, to take the full 21 days to make a decision unless there is an injury.

Story found in the St. Paul Pioneer Press

EWG: voluntary conservation isn’t enough

Seven years in the making, EWG’s Conservation Database allows Americans to see exactly where billions of dollars in conservation funding have gone. The data obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, is broken down by county.

“Used wisely and with the right incentives, farm conservation programs are making a difference in protecting our health, and improving our quality of life and the environment,” said Craig Cox, EWG Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources. “But we need to focus taxpayer dollars on getting the most effective practices in the right places to address the most urgent threats.”

Data obtained by the EWG through FOIA requests show where federal conservation dollars have been spent on projects, including cover crops.

Data obtained by the EWG through FOIA requests show where federal conservation dollars have been spent on projects, including cover crops.

The data, obtained through 28 FOIA requests over seven years, show that since 2005 farmers and landowners have received $29.8 billion in payments through four initiatives funded by Congress and administered by USDA.

-Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, $318 million

-Conservation Reserve Program, $20 billion

-Environmental Quality Incentives Program, $7.4 billion

-Conservation Stewardship Program, $2.2 billion

The data confirm the growing recognition that voluntary programs alone are insufficient. Voluntary programs in the federal farm bill can play an important role, but they aren’t leading to clean water, clean air and a healthy environment.

“It’s more than fair to expect farmers and landowners to do more to protect the environment in return for the generous farm and insurance subsidies they receive,” Cox said. “Americans across the country are seeing the price of farm pollution firsthand. It’s time for Congress to deliver a return on their tax dollars by requiring farmers who take money from these programs to do more to protect the environment and public health.”

Source: EWG

This article can be found at

CWD sampling in southeast MN deer harvest

Deer hunters in southeastern Minnesota who harvest a deer during the 3A and 3B firearms deer seasons are encouraged to have their deer sampled for chronic wasting disease (CWD) at one of 30 locations that will be staffed.

Due to the expansion of CWD in Iowa and Wisconsin, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will be conducting CWD surveillance in deer areas 339 to 349 throughout the firearm season, an area that includes nearly all the 300 series permit areas. The goal is to collect 3,600 samples. 

“Working with hunters to sample deer for evidence of CWD is our best opportunity for early detection of the disease in Minnesota,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager. “Early detection is important from the perspective of limiting disease spread, and we will make the process as quick as possible to get hunters on their way.”


The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will be testing harvested deer this fall for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). (photo from

CWD is caused by an abnormal protein called a prion that affects the animal’s brain. The disease is always fatal and can spread from one animal to another. Months to years pass from the time an animal is infected to when it shows signs of the disease. There is no known treatment for the disease, and the prions can persist and remain infectious in the environment. 

Recent research has demonstrated that long-term CWD infections in wild deer have led to measurable reductions in deer populations.

“We take these actions because our only real opportunity to reduce or eliminate disease is to find it right away,” Cornicelli said. “If a disease like CWD becomes established, it will be a problem for future generations.”

The DNR’s CWD management plan calls for surveillance when risk increases. That risk includes positive domestic animals or when the disease is found in adjacent states. 

“Much of the southeast has not been extensively sampled since 2009 and because of the Iowa and Wisconsin infections, it is important to aggressively conduct surveillance,” Cornicelli said. 

To further reduce the risk of CWD entering Minnesota, whole deer carcasses are no longer allowed to be imported into Minnesota from anywhere in North America. This is a new restriction this year in Minnesota. There are no restrictions on carcass movement for deer harvested in Minnesota and moved within the state.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) and other public health agencies have concluded there is no known link between CWD and any neurological disease in humans. However, both the CDC and the World Health Organization recommend that no part of a known positive animal should be consumed by humans. Additionally, there is no evidence that CWD can be naturally transmitted to species other ungulates.

Reminders for hunters, and chances to win
Hunters in the permit areas where sampling is taking place are reminded that they will not be able to register deer by phone or the internet during the surveillance period. Deer must be registered in person at a walk-in registration station and hunters are strongly encouraged to allow sampling of their deer. 

Deer must be present at the time of registration. When surveillance quotas are met, the electronic system will be turned back on. Hunters will not be notified of individual results unless their deer is positive. The DNR will release details after deer season that explain overall surveillance results.

CWD sampling only takes a few minutes and is done while the hunter registers their deer. To help encourage samples, Bluffland Whitetails Association has donated a compound bow and a muzzleloader and the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association has donated a muzzleloader. Hunters who submit a sample for testing will be entered into a random drawing for one of those items. Also, every hunter who donates a sample will be given a DNR cooperator patch as a small token of appreciation. 

DNR staff will be working at 30 sampling sites from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5, and Sunday, Nov. 6, and from 9 a.m. to noon on Monday, Nov. 7. A smaller number of stations will be open the second weekend, Saturday, Nov. 12, to Sunday, Nov. 13

Sampling goals will likely not be met during the opening 3A season that runs from Nov. 5 to Nov. 13, so stations will be staffed during the 3B season, which runs from Saturday, Nov. 19 to Sunday, Nov. 27.

Deer check stations where CWD surveillance is occurring are listed on the DNR website at, and hunters are encouraged to check the site for new information.

New hunters to chronic wasting disease might want to take a look at this:

MFU’s Peterson Named 2016 Friend of Extension

Doug Peterson’s life has revolved around agriculture for as long as he can remember. The soon-to-retire Minnesota Farmers Union President has been a strong advocate Minnesota agriculture for decades. Peterson received another honor from a major agriculture group in the state, winning the 2016 Distinguished Friend of Extension award winner on Tuesday, October 4.

The  award was announced on Tuesday by Dean Bev Durgan, who said that Peterson’s advocacy “has strengthened the University of Minnesota’s ability to create a strong Minnesota agriculture.”

Distinguished Friend of Extension

Retiring Minnesota Farmers Union President Doug Peterson was named a Distinguished Friend of Extension by the University of Minnesota Extension Service this week. (

President Peterson was lauded for his support of 4-H, including visionary contributions to the Minnesota’s pioneering 4-H Science of Agriculture program and the 4-H Purple Ribbon Auction at the State Fair.

Peterson and the Minnesota Farmers Union have played an important role helping secure legislative funding for Extension to create positive impacts across Minnesota. One of the biggest impacts is the Farmer-Lender Mediation program that helps farmers facing financial challenges.

Distinguished Friend of Extension

Bev Durgan, Dean of the University of Minnesota Extension Service, presented the Distinguished Friend of Extension Award to Minnesota Farmers Union President Doug Peterson earlier this week. (Photo from

“I’m proud to accept this award on behalf of the Minnesota Farmers Union members and in support of the hard work that the University of Minnesota and Extension does to advance family farming,” Peterson said.

Doug was always someone I looked forward to visiting with during my time as Farm Director at KLGR in Redwood Falls. He was very patient with the new guy covering agriculture and I learned an awful lot from visiting with him. Agriculture had a friend in Doug and I bet we haven’t heard the last of him on the state level. Best of luck in your retirement, Doug!





Want to see some of the things the Minnesota Farmers Union has been up to over the last year?




Minnesota Farmers Union, standing for agriculture and fighting for farmers (

Zero-interest loans for farmers with flooding damage

The Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) has lowered its interest rate on the Disaster Loan program to zero percent to help farmers cover the costs to replace and repair items lost or damaged due to flooding and not covered by insurance.

flooding, floods, disaster

Farmers with flooding in their fields may be eligible for help with zero interest loans available from the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority. (photo from

As with other RFA loans, the Disaster Loan program will be available for farmers through their existing agricultural lenders for financing for these repairs. The loans can be used to help clean up, repair, or replace farm structures and to replace seed, other crop inputs, feed, and livestock. The loan may also be used to repair and restore farm real estate that was damaged by flooding. The RFA participation is limited to 45 percent of the principal amount up to a maximum of $200,000.

The loans will be offered in the following 23 counties that have been declared a disaster by the Governor due to flooding conditions that started September 21, 2016 in Anoka, Blue Earth, Cottonwood, Dodge, Faribault, Freeborn, Goodhue, Hennepin, Houston, Le Sueur, Mower, Nicollet, Olmstead, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Sibley, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, Washington, and Winona counties.

“Minnesotans have a proud tradition of coming together to support one another after a disaster,” said Lt. Governor Tina Smith. “Providing zero interest loans to our ag producers will help them recover from severe weather and flooding. I encourage all eligible Minnesota farmers to apply for assistance.”

The RFA partners with local lenders to provide affordable credit to eligible farmers. Loan participations are purchased by the RFA under several programs that assist beginning farmers purchase agricultural land; finance improvements to the farm such as grain handling facilities, machine storage, and manure systems; help farmers reorganize their farm debt to improve cash flow; and, finance new livestock production facilities. Over $227 million has been invested in over 2,900 participations by the RFA in these programs.

Interested borrowers should contact their lender or call RFA at 651-201-6004. More information is also available on the RFA website at

Biodiesel mandate lawsuit against Minnesota dismissed

Ruling in favor of biodiesel mandate paves way for boosting renewable fuels and strong soybean demand

The State of Minnesota, Minnesota soybean farmers, and biodiesel producers won a complete dismissal Thursday in the lawsuit challenging the state’s biodiesel mandate. The decision by Chief Judge John Tunheim of the U.S. District Court in Minneapolis clears the road for summer blends of B20 (20 percent biodiesel blend) in May 2018 and continues to provide numerous benefits for all Minnesotans while adding value to Minnesota soybeans.

biodiesel lawsuit

Minnesota Soybean growers and biodiesel producers won a complete dismissal of a lawsuit challenging the Minnesota Biodiesel Mandate, clearing the way for B20 blends in the future. (photo from

“We are very pleased to see the state and Minnesota Soybean’s motions were successful in dismissing the case against the state’s biodiesel mandate,” said Theresia Gillie, Minnesota Soybean Growers Association president. “Once again, Minnesota is at the forefront of energy independence and supporting renewable fuels.”

The current B10 blend equates to annually removing 128,000 passenger vehicles from Minnesota roads and is America’s only advanced biofuel. B20 will bring more value to soybeans as it has stimulated Minnesota’s agricultural economy. By increasing demand for Minnesota soybeans by 13 percent, soybean biodiesel generates an estimated $200 million in economic activity.

“The benefits serve all Minnesotans,” said Mike Youngerberg, Minnesota Soybean’s senior director of field services. “Biodiesel reduces our dependence on imported petroleum while increasing farmer profitability, creating green jobs and boosting economic growth in Minnesota.”

soybean biodiesel lawsuit

Boosting the soybean biodiesel blend is expected to increase demand for Minnesota soybeans by 13 percent.

The added bonus is biodiesel, since 2005, has significantly improved air quality in Minnesota, among other environmental benefits. This is a win for all Minnesotans.

In his ruling, Judge Tunheim ruled Minnesota’s mandate is not preempted by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Minnesota’s mandate actually creates demand  and works in conjunction with the current RFS.

“Nearly all engine manufacturers approve B20 for their engines and now Minnesotans are ready for the move to B20,” Gillie said. “We thank the State of Minnesota for their vehement defense of the biodiesel mandate.”

MSGA is a non-profit, farmer-controlled membership organization established in 1962. Its goal is to assure profitable soybean farming by influencing favorable ag legislation, monitoring government policies and supporting research and market development.

China lifts 13-year old U.S. beef imports ban

Restoring American beef imports to China is a top priority for U.S. farmers because they want to take advantage of the country’s growing demand for meat.

But there are some conditions attached. Beef older than 30 months will still be barred, and U.S. exports will have to comply with China’s traceability and quarantine rules. China’s agriculture ministry did not say when beef imports would resume.

The U.S. Meat Export Federation called the announcement an “important first step.”

China first imposed a beef embargo in 2001 in response to mad cow disease in Europe. The agriculture ministry announced the ban would include American beef after the disease appeared in the U.S. in 2003.

China beef imports


The U.S. exports over 1 million metric tons of beef a year, worth $6.3 billion. Mexico is its largest export market, followed by Japan, South Korea, and Canada.

Here’s another edition of the ChadSmithMedia weekly podcast talking beef:


China is already the world’s second-biggest beef buyer. Imports grew roughly 10 times between 2010 and 2015, according to the U.S. meat export federation.

Demand for imported meat is growing in China as the country’s middle class gets richer, and domestic farmers can’t keep pace.

U.S. meat producers are hoping to return to China with a big bang. Australia, Uruguay, and New Zealand are currently the top exporters of beef to China.


Third-party response to the presidential debate

Did you even notice there’s a third-party candidate for President? I thought you might find this interesting, especially if you’re one of what appears to be a growing number of people who aren’t happy with the two major-party candidates for president. Here’ s the response of another presidential candidate in case you were looking at other options. Let me know if he’s on the right track or if they guy is one can short of a six-pack? I honestly do wish there was one perfect candidate we can all agree on, but….


I heard Donald Trump describing a country I don’t recognize, and I heard Hillary Clinton writing checks we can’t possibly cash.

third party

Gary Johnson is a former Governor of New Mexico and a Libertarian third-party candidate for president. (photo from

I suspect a great many of the millions who watched the debate did so in the hope that they would be inspired. With the possible exception of partisans on the extremes, I also suspect they were disappointed.

Americans don’t want their children and grandchildren to inherit a $20 trillion debt, and they didn’t hear anything [last night] that will keep that from happening. Ms. Clinton and Mr. Trump are afraid to tell the truth about spending. It’s easier to just promise more of it and send the next generation the tab.

Americans believe in the Constitution and the protections it’s supposed to provide. Mr. Trump appears willing to ‘frisk’ those protections away if they get in the way of his version of fixing things. There was a time when Republicans believed in free trade and creating jobs through growth, not protectionism. What happened to that?

Our military men and women and their families deserve leadership they can trust to not send them into harm’s way to intervene in conflicts they can’t possibly resolve and which may or may not have a clear U.S. interest. They didn’t get any reassurance [last night]. Americans want our military to protect us, not put their lives on the line to chase someone’s agenda.

We deserve better, but what we saw [last night] was a promise that the bickering, the pandering and the polarization will continue. America is already great. It’s great leaders we are lacking, and I don’t think we found them on the stage [last night].

Maybe that’s why Google searches for Gary Johnson are off the charts right now.

-Gov. Gary Johnson

CHIP IN to help put a third podium on the stage in October:

There’s also a third-party (fourth party?) candidate named Jill Stein. When did we as a country decide that we should only have two political parties in Washington? Why can’t we have more than two? How has choosing the “lesser of two evils?”

OSHA withdraws harmful fertilizer standards

U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that fertilizer retailers in North Dakota and across the country will not have to comply with harmful standards issued last year by the Administration. The standards – which the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) must withdraw – would have applied tough, across-the-board restrictions on agricultural retailers that sell anhydrous ammonia, a common fertilizer, seriously burdening retailers and farmers.


The U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that fertilizer retailers don’t have to live under new storage requirements that the Administration tried to implement without input from farmers and the agriculture industry.

In a decision issued this morning, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the administration should have gone through a formal rulemaking process, seeking more meaningful input from farmers and fertilizer retailers. The Administration created the new standards in a July 2015 memorandum, and they became effective immediately. However, because of language Heitkamp helped include in the end-of-the-year spending bill Congress passed last December, OSHA postponed enforcement of the guidance until October 1, 2016.

“As I said yesterday at a hearing I helped lead, the administration should have listened to farmers, retailers, and rural communities before creating these standards – and today the courts agreed,” said Heitkamp. “This is a victory for rural communities whose economies rely on farmers’ accessing inputs like anhydrous ammonia fertilizer. Complying with those standards could have cost each facility up to $50,000, according to the North Dakota Department of Agriculture. More than 30 North Dakota retailers said they would have had to stop selling the fertilizer. With those huge impacts on our farmers, it was clear all along that there should have been a formal rulemaking process rather than just agency guidance with little input from those impacted.”


Fall anhydrous applications aren’t that far away. The retailers that sell it don’t have to live under burdensome new regulations from OSHA, thanks to a decision on Friday from the U.S. Court of Appeals.

Just yesterday, Heitkamp pushed key administration officials for a solution on the standards, pointing out – as the court said in its decision today – that the proposed standards looked more like rulemaking than guidance. Heitkamp called on the administration to voluntarily delay enforcing the standards given the impact they would have on farmers and retailers. The new policy would have required facilities that store or transport 10,000 pounds or more of anhydrous ammonia to obtain Process Safety Management Standard documentation. If the facility could not obtain this documentation, it would have been forced to purchase new storage tanks, costing $70,000 or more.

OSHA did not choose the traditional notice-and-comment rulemaking process, which would have given retailers and farmers an opportunity for more meaningful consultation as the rule was developed, and instead issued interpretive guidance, which did not include substantial input from affected industries.

In July, Heitkamp and Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE) introduced bipartisan legislation to stop these harmful federal standards from going into effect. It would also require the agency to abide by a formal rulemaking process when instituting a similar policy change in the future. Click here to view text of the FARM Act.



Palmer amaranth detected in Minnesota

 ST. PAUL, Minn. – Crop scientists at the University of Minnesota and officials at the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) urge farmers to check fields for Palmer amaranth, an aggressive weed that can put corn and soybean crops at risk. A plant detected in a native seed planting plot on a Yellow Medicine County farm was confirmed today to be Palmer amaranth. This is the first confirmation of the weed in the state.

The MDA asks possible infestations to be reported by contacting the MDA’s Arrest the Pest line by phone at 1-888-545-6684 or by email at Landowners are encouraged to email photos of suspected infestations for identification.

“We encourage landowners to scout fields now before harvest for Palmer amaranth and report any possible infestations to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture,” said Geir Friisoe, MDA’s Director of Plant Protection. “The quicker we’re able to identify and start managing this weed, the better our chances will be to minimize the impact to our ag industry.”

Palmer amaranth

Palmer Amaranth has been found in Minnesota and the Department of Agriculture wants farmers to keep an eye on their fields to help nip this in the bud before an infestation can occur. (Photo by Bruce Potter)


Palmer amaranth can grow 2 to 3 inches a day, typically reaching 6 to 8 feet, or more, in height. Left uncontrolled, a single female Palmer amaranth plant typically produces 100,000 to 500,000 seeds. It is resistant to multiple herbicides.

It has been found in 28 other states, including Iowa, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

“Palmer amaranth infestations have caused substantial yield losses and greatly increased weed management costs in cotton, soybeans, and corn in the southern states,” said Extension agronomist and crops leader Jeff Gunsolus. “This is a disconcerting, though not completely unexpected, discovery in Minnesota. We have been discussing proper identification procedures with crop consultants over the last three or more years.”

Close-up of Palmer amaranth

Palmer Amaranth has been found in Minnesota fields and it’s important for farmers to watch their fields in order to avoid an outbreak in farm fields across the state. (Photo by Bruce Potter)


Extension and MDA officials commend the grower and crop consultant who quickly contacted Extension after discovering a suspected Palmer amaranth plant. The weed is on MDA’s prohibited-eradicated noxious weed list, requiring all above- and below-ground parts of the plant be destroyed. Transportation, propagation or sale of the plants is prohibited.

MDA and Extension continue coordinating action steps to address the weed.

The MDA is investigating how the weed may have been introduced to the state.

In August, an Extension blog updated steps for both prevention and management at

Further information is available at