RCTC football becomes impromptu family reunion

As long as there’ve been athletic competitions like football, fathers have been taking their sons to games to enjoy a little bonding time.  Most sports fans I know have at least one favorite story of going to games with their dad and hanging out.  Good times with their dads will often lead kids to continue the tradition when they become parents themselves.

RCTC football equals a family reunion

The Rochester Community and Technical College football team beat Minnesota West in its home opener on Saturday, September 3, by a 26-8 score to even the overall season record at 1-1. (photo by Chad Smith

I got to take my two oldest boys with me to the Rochester Community and Technical College football game today.  If you know anything about what my family went through over the last four years, you’d know what a monumental thing that is.  It seems like such a small thing to go to a football game, doesn’t it?   When you haven’t been able to do that thing for a long time due to circumstances beyond your control, that little thing becomes big.

The day was a knockout for a college football game with temps in the 70’s.  There was just enough cloud cover to keep the heat from becoming oppressive, as it’s been known to do in late August/early September.  But no, this was a perfect day to watch football.

I’ll admit, it wasn’t the prettiest game I’ve seen in some time.  There weren’t a lot of big plays for either offense but the Yellowjackets came away with a 26-8 win to even their record at 2-0.  I didn’t recognize a lot of their players from last year’s squad. That team finished runner-up in the national championship game last year.  Last year’s coaching staff is gone too, so it’s going to be a rebuilding year for the Jackets.

I’d love to see those college athletic teams get more support from the Rochester community.  Those kids play hard and the cost to see them play is actually pretty affordable.  The facilities are some of the nicest I’ve seen in all my years of covering sports, so it’s worth the time and a little investment to take in the college atmosphere.

I’ve got a son and wife who are students out to RCTC, so I’m looking forward to getting to know the place a lot better in the months ahead.  Sure, it would be nice to see more Rochester folks out there.  If you’re a sports fan, you’re definitely missing out on some fun.

The offensive struggles made highlights a little harder to come by, but the Yellowjackets offense did find some rhythm in the second half.

Dairy Night at Mayo Field with the Honkers

Milking cows in the middle of a baseball game?  As a farm boy and lifelong baseball fan, there was no way in the world I was going to pass that up.

Dairy night at the Ballpark in Rochester, Minnesota

Mayo Field in Rochester, Minnesota, was home to Dairy Night at the Ballpark, featuring the 22nd annual cow milking contest to help promote agriculture. (photo by Chad Smith)

The Rochester Honkers baseball team was home to the St. Cloud Rox in Northwoods League baseball on Friday night, July 8.  The night’s sponsor included the Olmsted County American Dairy Association, with help from the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation.  It was Dairy Night at the ballpark with an unusual way to promote agriculture.

The highlight of the night was a cow milking contest that took place at the end of the first inning.  And this wasn’t a new idea, either.  For over 20 years, the Honkers have been hosting an annual milking contest.  This year’s edition featured coaches from both teams in a one-minute, old-fashioned milking contest.  There wasn’t a milking machine to be found for miles.  This one was done by hand.

Dairy Night at the Ballpark In Rochester, Minnesota, sponsored by the Olmsted County ADA

St Cloud Rox Assistant Baseball Coach Phil Imholte is ready for the Dairy Night at the Ballpark main event, a cow milking contest intended to help promote agriculture at Mayo Field in Rochester, Minnesota. (Photo by Chad Smith)

Honkers Manager Trevor Hairgrove was the Rochester entrant and Rox Assistant Coach Phil Imholte was a good sport by jumping into the contest for St. Cloud.  Hairgrove was the eventual contest winner in spite of the fact that his cow was much more agitated and jumpy than Imholte’s.

“It was the 22nd annual Cow Milking Contest,” said Minnesota Farm Bureau Southeast Area Program Director Katie Brenny.  “It was put on by the Olmsted County American Dairy Association and we were glad to join them and help promote agriculture.”

The cows were on loan from the Shea Dairy farm near Viola, Minnesota.  June was officially Dairy Month across the country, but they wanted to continue to promote agriculture with the Rochester Honkers here in early July.

A dairy cow is jumpy while getting ready for the Dairy Night at the Ballpark event in Rochester, Minnesota.

A dairy cow on loan from the Shea Dairy farm near Viola, Minnesota, isn’t excited about being in the Dairy Night at the Ballpark milking contest on Friday night, July 8, at Mayo Field in Rochester, Minnesota. (photo by Chad Smith)

“It’s important to do this because consumers have questions,” Brenny said.  “They want to know where their food comes from and how it’s grown, and we hope they also want to know the people who are producing their food, getting up early in the morning to do the chores and drive the tractor.”

If agriculture doesn’t promote itself, she said consumers with questions typically get their information from non-factual sources .  Farmers want to tell their stories, similar to the way a teacher wants to tell others what they teach or doctors want to talk about what they do.

“There’s always work to do to tell our story,” she said.  “Agriculture changes almost every day, and if we’re not sharing the change, no one will know what we’re doing.  For instance, 97 percent of our farms are family owned and we love to share that message with others.  Farmers are more than willing to answer any questions about what they do.”

Heading home after Dairy Night at the Ballpark in Rochester, Minnesota.

Heading home to the dairy farm after the Cow Milking Contest at Mayo Field in Rochester, Minnesota, on Friday night for Dairy Night at the Ballpark, sponsored by the Olmsted County American Dairy Association (Photo by Chad Smith

Katie is the Southeast Area Program Director for the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation.  She spends a lot of time keeping things organized for Farm Bureau members in this part of the state.

“I work with all 11 counties down here in the southeast,” Brenny said, “doing anything from working with our elected officials on Ag policy to consumer events such as tonight, partnering with Ag commodity groups, county fairs, Ag in the Classroom, and more.  We were just at the Rochester Farmer’s Market last weekend and doing all kinds of events to promote the voice of agriculture.”

Brenny and some volunteers spent some time Thursday at the Ronald McDonald House in Rochester.  Some of the pictures can be found here.

In addition to the dairy contest, there was some pretty good baseball too as you’ll see in a few highlights I’ve put together here.

It’s time to “Fetch” the groceries

When shoppers walk in the door of the Rushford Foods grocery store, things will look the same on the surface, but there’s a small change in the environment that means a big change for grocery shopping.

Groceries and Fetch are now together in the technology age

Rushford Foods is one of the newest stores trying to bring grocery shopping into the technology age with an application called “Fetch,” that seeks to make grocery shopping more efficient for shoppers of all ages. (photo from rushfordfoods.com)

The pop culture saying “there’s an app for that” now applies to grocery shopping.  Rushford Foods is now gone online with an application called Fetch, which is designed to make patrons into more efficient shoppers.  The options on the app are many, but they’re surprisingly easy to learn.

“Fetch is two years old and based in Madison, Wisconsin,” said Tristan Bednarek of Fetch Rewards.   “Chief Executive Officer Wes Schroll is the company’s founder.  As a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he grew frustrated with some aspects of grocery shopping, especially with the length of time it took and the difficulty in finding coupons.  He found a way to fix those problems.”

It’s time to “Fetch” the groceries

The Fetch Rewards company’s “Fetch” grocery shopping application is online at IGA food stores in Rushford, Preston, and Harmony, Minnesota food stores to help make grocery shopping easier for shoppers of all ages. (Photo from superbcrew.org)

Fetch is a free mobile application that shoppers can download onto their smartphones or tablets.  However, if customers don’t own their own device, Rushford Foods will provide tablets for them to use.  All they have to do is check out one at the service counter.

Using an application to help their customers shop isn’t something that Rushford Foods jumped into.  It’s been a process that first began 18 months ago thanks to an article in a college newsletter.

“The founder of Fetch is a University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate,” said Rushford Foods co-owner Brad Hoiness, “but I went to school at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, and the story appeared the La Crosse newsletter. It peaked my interest, so I drove to Madison and met with his team over there and watched how it’s been developing since then.”The first step in using the app is a simple one:  open up the app on your smart device.

“The Deals page is the first one you see when the application opens up,” said Emma Malone of Rushford Foods. “You grab the coupon you want by hitting the Fetch button.  Coupons can even be divided into categories like Dairy or Frozen foods.”

“The Deals page is the first one you see when the app is running,” said Emma Malone of Rushford Foods. “You grab the coupon you want by hitting the Fetch button.  Coupons can even be divided into categories like Dairy or Frozen foods.”

As shoppers go through the aisles and scan items, they are awarded a certain number of points for each item, and those points are redeemable for free items.

Get the groceries with the new “Fetch” application

Photographs from the Piggly Wiggly grocery store in Mayville WI. where they are using a software app that allows to people to scan products in the store with their phones or the store has 6 loaner tablet devices, receive coupons instantly and have expedited check-out. You also get points and then can get free products. Fetch Rewards is the name of the Madison-based company that sets this up. Here Mike Hansen of Horicon scans in a bar code from the mushrooms he was buying with one of the store’s loaner tablets. (Photo from MICHAEL SEARS/MSEARS@JOURNALSENTINEL.COM)

“As shoppers walk up and down the aisles, they’re scanning everything they’re buying,” Bednarek said.  “The camera on your device will scan the barcodes for you and total up the prices of what you’re buying.  The app uses your camera and you don’t even have to press any buttons to scan something.  It takes the picture all by itself.  The item then gets thrown in your digital cart while you put it in your actual shopping cart.”

The app keeps a running total of what you’ve bought as you scan each item.  It doesn’t add sales tax so the checkout line final total will be a little different.  The application will show you different coupon options available for the items you want to purchase.

“Those coupons you select in the app come off automatically as you shop,” he said.  “When a coupon is available for something you scan and you haven’t selected it previously, you’ll see a pop-up that asks if you want to save money on the item.  All you do is hit the Fetch button.”

Buying produce will be a little different than most of the other items.  You begin by scanning the barcodes on each produce table which will contain several different options.

“Once you scan the barcode,” said Malone, “a list of everything on the table pops up and shoppers will select the one they want.  A blue button on the screen will remind shoppers to take the produce to scales to weigh the product.  Once it’s on the scale, a barcode pops up in the top right corner with the weight and price.  You scan that barcode with your smart device and it goes right into your virtual shopping cart.”

The Fetch Rewards company loads coupons into the application, and their manufacturer partners do too. Each store that signs up with Fetch will offer their own coupons too.

“You’ll get the same store savings using the app,” Bednarik said, “as we’re not replacing anything.  We’re just an addition on top of what the stores are doing.  Customers still have the opportunity to use manufacturer coupons that they clip out of newspapers.”

When the time comes to redeem the bonus points, shoppers should first hit the checkout button.  A list of everything you have will pop up and show how much you saved on each item.  The total number of points available determines how many of the shopping items will be free.  Each item will cost a certain number of redeemable points and the more of those shoppers have, the more they save.

Fetch Rewards just partnered with a company called Shop Well and the application can now flag nutritional information as well.  This is especially important for shoppers who suffer from food allergies or simply want to live healthier.

“They provide us with nutritional information,” Bednarek said.  “If you scan an item, you have the option to look at its ingredients list and it gives information like sodium content or cholesterol amounts.  Shoppers can even update their profiles to include food allergies and gluten intolerance.  All those things can be flagged so that when you scan an item, it will let you know.”

Southeast Minnesota grocery stores where Fetch is now available include Rushford Foods, as well as Harmony Foods and Preston Foods.  All three IGA food stores just went live with the application for the first time last Wednesday.

“We’ve trained the employees first, getting them comfortable and familiar with the app,” Bednarek said.  “They can answer any questions customers ask.

“We’ve also had several people use it to check out their groceries and they’ve said it’s very easy to learn,” Bednarek added.  “I’ve even had people tell me it turned grocery shopping a little more fun, which is not something you hear on a regular basis.”

Here’s a demonstration video I put together when I was doing the story for Bluff Country News.  I didn’t actually intend to put it up for public viewing, but I thought it would give a decent enough idea of how Fetch works.  If you put your playback on the HD setting, I think the picture is good enough to understand.  Of course, you can also go to Rushford Foods or any of the other stores that have it for more  information.

Chad

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm a success

Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm a big hit!

The second annual Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm was a big success at the Jary and Celene Holst dairy farm near Kellogg. (Photo by Chad Smith)

The second annual Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm took place on the Jary and Celene Holst dairy farm near Kellogg last Friday night.  A warm summer evening saw a great turnout and a wide variety of activities for people of all ages to take part in.

The goal was a simple one:  to introduce the non-farm public to the people behind the food they eat and to show them what goes into producing that food.  Displays of old and new farm equipment lined the farmyard, as well as history displays, a petting zoo, a lunch stand, kids activities, and much more that made for a busy family night on the farm.

Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm a big hit with children

People of all ages had a chance to get up close and personal at Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm at the Jary and Celene Holst farm near Kellogg on a beautiful Friday evening. (photo by Chad Smith)

“This is the second year of doing this event,” said Katie Brown, a member of the group putting on the event.  “Last year, many of us put together the first event last year at Klein’s Cow Palace near Lake City.  This year, the Holst family graciously offered to host the event out here, so it’s a new event for our county but we’re hoping to make it a tradition.”

Brown described the turnout on Friday night as “amazing.”  Events like this just don’t happen without a large number of people who are passionate about agriculture and want to tell its story to people who don’t have much of a connection to the farm.

“We want to make sure we tell the next generation about what farmers do every day and how hard they work,” said Brown, who lives in Millville, “and not just in the dairy industry but every segment of farming, including corn and soybean farmers, and hog producers.  We just want to make sure we share that story with everyone.”

Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm included agricultural history

Ag history was on display with antique farm equipment at the second annual Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm near Kellogg. The non-farm public had a chance to learn more about ag history and see some of the newest available equipment on display too. (Photo by Chad Smith)

The list of activities was a long one on Friday night.  The displays included the history of agriculture, with actual working equipment from back in the day as well as some of the newest equipment, a chance to watch the dairy farm at work, and plenty for the kids to do as well.

“We have a little bit of history,” Brown said as she took a break from helping at the lunch counter, “not just about the farm but how agriculture has changed.  We have a cream separator, which a lot of people may not know how it works, so it’ll be interesting to watch that.  We have a large sand pile for kids with hidden baseballs to find for a chance to win Twins tickets.  We have old and new tractors, a pedal tractor, calf feeding, and much more.”

She said it’s incredibly important to do more activities like this because of that growing disconnect between urban folks and people on the farm.  She sees that disconnect every day in her job as a Calf and Heifer Specialist with Land O’ Lakes.

Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm offered a chance to get up close and personal with a dairy farm.

Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm included a chance for the non-farm public to watch cow being milked in a working dairy on the Jary and Celene Holst farm near Kellogg. (photo by Chad Smith)

“I’ve been involved in the American Dairy Association and the dairy industry all my life,” Brown said.  “I’ve become very good friends with a couple from New York, and when I explain what I do when working with dairy farmers on the nutrition side making diets for cows and calves, they said ‘you do what?’  It’s interesting to talk to people that have no experience on a farm and tell them about what farmers do on a daily basis.

“When they ask ‘how do you milk a cow,’ they see you sitting on a stool between cows,” she said.  “We send them pictures showing that there’s a new way of milking cows in parlors which is more safe for humans and more efficient to operate.  It’s interesting to hear their take on it.”

As Brown was watching people walk by, she did see a lot of people from the surrounding community but did notice a large number of people who came from far away to enjoy a night on the farm with their family.  The other noticeable thing about the crowds was an incredible number of oranges shirts that signified volunteers who were helping the event run smoothly.

Lots of volunteer help at Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm

Family Night on the Farm organizer Katie Brown said there’s no way she could put an event like that together without lots of volunteer help, who were seen wearing bright orange shirts like this one all over the farm. (Photo by Chad Smith)

“I definitely couldn’t do it myself,” she said with a smile, “the Holst family has been great about bringing in family members and neighbors to help out.  The tractor club helps out, and so does the Farm Bureau, the Farmers Union, and people sometimes just come in to help without being asked.  They show up and say ‘give me a shirt and tell me what to do.’  That’s when you know you’re truly in an agricultural community when people step forward to help.  They step forward to help even when sign-up sheets at local banks are filled up.”

Brown and many of the other people running the event have roots that run deep in agriculture.  Katie grew up on a dairy farm and is very proud of what her family does.  Although she and her husband don’t dairy farm, their kids still get the experience of being on a farm regularly when they want to.  Not everyone is so fortunate to have farming in their immediate, or even extended, family.

Kids activities at Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm

A big goal of Family Night on the Farm is to educate the next generation of future adults about how agriculture works and introduce them to the people behind the food they eat. (photo by Chad Smith)

“I do worry about the next generation getting further and further away from understanding what is going on in farming,” Brown said.  “It’s not generally even the grandparents that farmed any more, it’s getting further away in the family.  It’s vital that we share our story with the next generation about where their food comes from, otherwise, they won’t appreciate it as much as they should.”

Last year, she was hoping for approximately 200 people to show up and they had an actual turnout closer to 600 people.  This year, the goal was 900 people.

“It feels good to see the turnout and it’s a beautiful evening,” Brown said.  “It’s exciting to see so many people show up.”

 

Here’s the complete interview with Katie Brown shortly after I pulled her out from behind the lunch counter for a quick chat.  I think you can hear just how busy the place was in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Checking out the Friendship Wagon Train in Rushford

Talk about getting some sun this weekend.

Friendship Wagon Train

One of the many wagon trains parked in Rushford on Sunday night during a stopover for the 28th annual Friendship Wagon Train which is touring southeast Minnesota to raise funds for Camp Winnebago. (photo by Chad Smith

After spending some time with the wife and one of my many sons at the Wabasha County Family Night on the Farm on Friday night, I hit the road for Fountain to take a few pictures of their Trail Days Festival for the Bluff Country Newspaper Group.  I’m really not sure which paper these pics go in, but that’s okay.  The company has six papers and their corresponding websites and plans to add more so that’s just more to keep track of.

I drove down to Rushford on Sunday night to check out the Friendship Wagon Train that was camping out in Rushford.  What a beautiful night it was!  In case you don’t know what it is, this Train and the folks that participate have a simple goal:  They want to raise money for a place called Camp Winnebago, which is just outside of Caledonia.

Friendship Wagon Train Rides again

After covering 15-20 miles a day on the Friendship Wagon Train, it was time to cool off the horses during a Sunday night stop in Rushford. The Wagon Train continues through the rest of this week

The camp does really great work with adults and children that have developmental disabilities.  They bring the folks down for a week at a time, so it’s a series of one-week camps for the adults and children to get outside and enjoy the outdoors, which may be something that the rest of us take a little for granted.

This wagon train has been raising around $30,000 a year for the last several years, and the money goes straight to the camp for what Wagon Master John Davis calls ‘camperships.’  They help to pay the way for someone who can’t afford it to come to camp.

Friendship Wagon Train

It takes a lot of people, vehicles, and livestock to put on a successful Friendship Wagon Train, seen here during a stop Sunday night in Rushford. They’re touring southeast Minnesota to raise funds for developmentally disabled adults and children. (photo by Chad Smith

Got to see John and the folks on a beautiful day in Rushford as they work to support a great cause.  I asked John what it’s like to travel for a week straight in a covered wagon?  He said, and I quote, “I can’t believe the divorce rate wasn’t higher!”  He was laughing as he said it.  You do spend a lot of time together with your spouse and the rest of the group, and the weather conditions may not always cooperate.  After all, “We don’t have any dang air conditioning in the wagon,” is how John described it.

Here’s a few of the pics I took Sunday night.  I’ll have the complete coverage of the event this week in bluffcountrynews.com and the Tri-County Record.

 

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Friendship Wagon Train

It’s time to get some shade and rest during an overnight stop in Rushford for the Friendship Wagon Train, which is on tour around southeast Minnesota to raise funds for scholarships to Camp Winnebago. (photo by Chad Smith)

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Friendship Wagon Train

The livestock gets a break on Sunday night from the Friendship Wagon Train during a layover in Rushford. (photo by Chad Smith)

 

Tractor Safety Class brings back farm memories

I had some serious flashbacks to the teen years when I got an assignment to take some pictures at a Tractor Safety Class in Rushford the other day. Watching some wide-eyed 12-15-year-old kids drive a tractor through an obstacle course and have to hook up the hydraulics of a commercial mower to the back of a different tractor looked like fun and a challenge all at the same time.

As a middle-aged man, the first thing you’re tempted to do is compare what the equipment of today is like to what you grew up on years ago.  Of course, the biggest difference is electronics and buttons to push instead of hydraulic levers to yank every time you wanted to do something.

The other big difference is an enclosed cab versus an open air seat.  I remember a lot of 90-100 degree days where air conditioning would have been nice, but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, right?

I also didn’t know that the hydraulic hoses are now color-coded to make it easier to hook up to a tractor, which is a nice change from the old days.

The kids that took the course had to sit in a classroom for a couple of days before they got to go outside on one of the most beautiful days of the year to take the practical tests.  Did you ever have to back up farm equipment before and the implements appeared to do the exact opposite of what you wanted it to?  You turn it the OPPOSITE way of the direction you wanted it to go?  How aggravating could that be when you first were learning the business?

Tractor Safety Class is a good thing.

The Bobcat skid steer loader was always my favorite equipment to operate, but it wasn’t always an easy gig when you’re first learning how to operate it! (photo from bobcatrental.ca)

One of the more embarrassing flashbacks was learning to drive a skid steer.  That was always my favorite thing to operate, but the first time I tried to load it up onto the trailer, I forgot you need to take it up backward.  You can imagine what came next, right?  It winds up on its backside, but all I needed to do was push the levers forward and it was back on all four wheels.  It’s probably not hard to believe that it took awhile for me to stop hearing about that one!

I didn’t know this course was federally mandated.  You obviously will need the certification to work on farms, but it’s also necessary to work on the big commercial-scale lawnmowers as well, so keep that in mind.

 

 

 

Ag businesses working hard to find labor

The nation’s unemployment rate remained steady through January at 4.9 percent. The US Department of Labor said over a half million workers were discouraged, meaning they had quit looking for work because they believe no jobs are out there for them.

Businesses across the agricultural spectrum want those folks to know there are jobs out there. Ag is having an especially hard time finding skilled labor, and businesses in Nebraska and Kansas are taking some unusual steps to find the help they need. Those steps include tuition reimbursement for students as well as hiring their first corporate recruiters to build relationships with those students.

Ag businesses working hard to find skilled labor

Landmark Implement of Nebraska and Kansas is taking unusual steps to overcome a serious shortage of skilled workers in the Ag labor force. (Photo from Twitter.com)

“My responsibilities are twofold,” said Deanna Karmazin, the new Corporate Recruiter at Landmark Implement, a John Deere dealer. “We have 17 dealerships across Nebraska and Kansas, and I’m trying to fill our open positions. Those positions include service techs, people at the parts counter, and people to work in wash bays, do the maintenance, and such.

“The second part of it will be to work with high school Ag programs and tech programs across Nebraska,” Karmazin said. “We have to cultivate a workforce. I’m trying to identify kids that would like to enter the field of diesel technology, or precision farming, get them under the Landmark umbrella, get them sent off to school and guarantee them employment.”

Deanna knew going into her job that labor would be hard to find. What she didn’t realize is that there just aren’t many young people that understand agriculture.

“You might have some that know how to work on engines,” she said, “but they really don’t understand what a tractor or combine is. They may not even understand the agricultural lingo.”

Stories abound regarding the “graying of production agriculture, i.e. farmers.” But even businesses that serve Agriculture are having a hard time replacing some of their older workers when they decide to step away.

“It’s been very tough for us to find skilled labor,” said Rick Kloke, the Corporate Service Tech Supervisor at Landmark. “In a lot of ways, it’s one of the biggest things that limits us in terms of being more productive. It’s not tooling or internal resources, it’s just the manpower to get jobs done.

Ag businesses working hard to attract skilled labor.

250 High school students exploring careers as John Deere technicians at SCC Milford, Nebraska. (contributed photo)

“In south-central Nebraska (Hastings dealership,), we tend to bring in people with strong agricultural backgrounds,” Kloke said. “We’ve lost a fair amount of guys who want to go home and see if they can make things work on the family farm.”

He added, “Some guys are successful, but some are back within a few years. Losing guys will create a big void for us. Even the guys that come back have fallen behind after a few years because the technology has changed so much.”

As a corporate recruiter, Karmazin has a lot of tools she uses to develop relationships with people and organizations that can help her grow their workforce. Internet options for advertising jobs include their own website as well as careerbuilder.com. She said the rest comes from word-of-mouth. She said people in small towns generally have the best ideas about top potential candidates.

Chambers of Commerce within cities in Nebraska and Kansas also makes good sources, especially when they host job fairs.

“As our workforce has aged out, Ag hasn’t done a good job of succession planning for the next generation of workers,” Karmazin said. “Also, things have changed so much with tractors and other equipment running on computers now. We’re looking for a different type of laborer than in the past.”

Once the recruiting process singles out good candidates, Karmazin said Landmark Implement is taking another step to cultivate their workforce.

Ag businesses working hard to find skilled labor

Jim Cope is a senior at Springfield Platteview high school in Nebraska. He is one of the students LandMark is sponsoring through the John Deere tech program. He will start college in October.  (Contributed photo)

“We will sponsor them through the John Deere Tech Program at the Southeast Community College campus in Milford, Nebraska,” Karmazin said, “or anywhere there’s a John Deere tech program. They become certified John Deere technicians. They’ll be working on all the older and newer equipment, and have all the diagnostics for John Deere.”

She added, “Once they’re in there, they’ll understand all of the equipment from start to finish.”

Landmark will offer students a paid shadow experience. They’ll pay the kids for between 60–90 days to do career exploration to see if it’s something they want to do before they get into any of the tech programs in Nebraska or Kansas.

Students also get on the job experience and a paycheck while they go to school to learn. When they graduate, they’re guaranteed a job at any of the locations, plus, the company will help pay their tuition.

“We take their tuition (minus housing) and prorate it every month,” Deanna said, “so every month they work for us, they take off a part of that debt. If they stay for 36 months, 100 percent of their tuition will be paid off completely in three years.”

The program has been going on for a few years, and it’s been very successful so far.

“We’ve gotten some very good people out of it,” said Rick Kloke, “and several of them are destined to be more than shop floor technicians. I see some future leaders in that group.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March Weed of the Month: Edible and Dangerous

Minnesota Department of Ag Logo In Minnesota, we have some poisonous plants commonly growing in home and community gardens of which we can safely eat certain parts (like tomatoes or other nightshades). In this article we will focus on a few of these vegetable and fruit crops that have poisonous parts—Nightshades, Prunus species, and Rhubarb.

The Solanaceous family, also known as the Nightshade family, includes such plants as tomato, potato, pepper, and eggplant. These plants all contain the toxin solanine in varying amounts in the green plant parts. The leaves of Solanaceous plants usually must be ingested in large quantities to produce harmful effects in humans and animals. Potatoes have the potential to be the most dangerous; tubers that have turned green and/or sprouted due to sunlight exposure or improper storage have high amounts of solanine, and should never be eaten. A small percentage of the population is allergic to Solanaceous fruits. For some with sensitive skin, brushing against the hairy and resinous leaves can cause irritation or rash.

 The Prunus (stone fruit) family includes plum, cherry, apricot, almond, and native fruit trees like chokecherry, black cherry, and wild plum. These trees all have trace amounts of cyanolipids in the leaves and amygdalin in the seeds. These compounds can be converted into the toxin cyanide when the leaves are crushed and exposed to air (as after mulching or chipping) or upon chewing and digestion. After this decomposition process, poisonous amounts of cyanide may be released. Accidental poisoning may occur in humans, especially by curious children, but it most commonly occurs in livestock and pets. The smaller size of dogs and cats can make them particularly susceptible.

Edible and dangerous, all at the same time

There are toxic compounds in the leaves of a rhubarb plant, but humans must ingest large amounts to be dangerous. However, small animals like cats and dogs wouldn’t have to ingest much to be toxic. (contributed photo)

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) is a beloved vegetable grown in Minnesota’s home and community gardens. An herbaceous perennial with thick rhizomes, it is grown for its tart, fleshy stalks. Most people do not realize that rhubarb’s leaves contain oxalic acid, among other unidentified poisonous substances. The stalks contain trace amounts of this compound but are obviously safe for consumption. There are a number of references to accidental poisonings occurring in Europe during World War I, as the rhubarb leaves were apparently recommended as food during the scarcity of wartime. People must ingest large quantities of leaves to experience the toxic effect, but small animals like cats and dogs can fairly easily ingest too much. 

Edible and dangerous, all at the same time.

The leaves of the potato plant contain a toxin called solanine, which much be ingested in large amounts to be toxic. However, a potato that’s turned green or sprouted due to too much sunlight or improper storage will contain high amounts of the toxin, and should never be eaten. (contributed photo)

 We clearly are intimately linked to these plants and will continue to grow and harvest from them in our home and community gardens. With the knowledge that specific plant parts can be harmful to pets or children if ingested, we should use them with precaution. Please contact Minnesota Poison Control with any concerns about potential human poisoning at 800-222-1222poisonhelp@hcmed.org, or www.mnpoison.org.

Minnesota Greyhound Rescue helping racers find homes

Greyhound rescue at work

Greyhounds are a little unusual if you’ve never seen them up close, but they are very friendly and intelligent. Greyhounds are available for adoption at www.minnesotagreyhoundrescue.org)

Greyhound racing is big business in 15 states across the country, with millions of dollars won and lost. The greyhounds themselves live their lives either running on a racetrack or in a kennel for long distance transportation.

A concerned group of Minnesotans worries about what happens to greyhounds that can no longer race effectively and make money on the track. After 4 or 5 effective years at most, that’s it. Minnesota Greyhound Rescue simply wants to make sure these dogs get to live out the balance of their post-race lives in loving homes.

“I got my first greyhound nine years ago,” said Kelly Johnson of Rochester, who’s been involved with Minnesota Greyhound Rescue ever since. Lloyd and Jen Komatsu of Inver Grove Heights are also involved in the group. “Brad Kittleson and I typically set up most of the adoptions we do each year.”

Her first interaction with greyhounds came about by accident. It involved an unfortunate accident with a smaller family pet.

“I went to a pet store to get a fish,” Johnson said. “A fish accidentaly went down the sink and my children were not happy. The greyhounds were in the store and I’d never seen one before, never been to a track, and didn’t know what they were. There was my first greyhound, Catch, and I fell in love with him.”

She added, “My family thought I was nuts, but here were are years laterbecause that started the whole thing.”

Greyhound Rescue at work

Minnesota Greyhound Rescue wants you to know that greyhounds make great family pets. They want and need to interact with humans, whether adults or kids. (photo by Chad Smith)

Greyhounds may be a little unusual to look at if you’ve never seen one. On first impression, Kelly thought greyhounds actually looked a little “funny,” but it was Catch’s personality that won her over.

“I liked how he acted when I first saw him,” Johnson said. “Then I went to see him again and there were nine other greyhounds with him, and they all were sleeping. So I just sat down in the middle of them and thought ‘yep, this is what I’m supposed to do.’”

You may hear the word greyhound and think these dogs would need to run constantly after years of being on the racetrack. Johnson said they’re personalities are actually very different from that. Lazy, calm, and quiet are just a few of the words she would use to describe a typical greyhound.

Greyhound Rescue at work

Greyhounds come in a variety of sizes and colors, and Minnesota Greyhound Rescue has a good selection of males and females to choose from. Fill out an application today at www.minnesotagreyhound.org)

“When we do big events like the Pet Expo and the State Fair, Johnson said, “we’ve had anywhere up to 12 dogs there at one time, and they’re all sound asleep. People ask us all the time what we put in their food to make them sleep like that. There’s nothing in their food, it’s just who they are.

“They’re trained to sleep at the racetrack, and that’s who they become,” she added.

She said the rescue part of Minnesota Greyhound Rescue stems from the fact that the animals may not be as well cared for as she would hope. Johnson said she has no problem with greyhound racing, but simply wants to give the dogs a good place to live when their racing career is over.

She said the dogs are typically done racing at the end of their fifth year. However, the end can come much quicker than that. If a dog doesn’t finish first, second, or third in six straight races, they’re done racing for good. Johnson said why not give the animals that have worked so hard a place to rest after their labors are over?

For those who might be looking to adopt a greyhound, she wants them to stop by their website first for more information at www.minnesotagreyhoundrescue.org. Johnson said families should know that greyhounds make great family dogs because they’re good with children.

“I have 3 kids of my own that have grown up with greyhounds,” said Johnson. “They love kids and are great with them. The only thing they don’t like is when kids jump on them while sleeping. The animals aren’t used to being touchedwhen they sleep because they spend so much time in kennels when they’re younger so it scares them.”

Greyhound Rescue

Minnesota Greyhound Rescue has several new dogs in need of loving homes. They make great family pets, and if you happen to be in the market, fill out an application at www.minnesotagreyhoundrescue.org (Photo by Chad Smith)

You also want to not intrude too much when they’re in a kennel. They’re used to being left alone in their kennel, because that’s where they spent most of their time. As with most animals, and even humans, it simply takes a little time to adjust to a new home.

“They typically get along good with other breeds of dogs,” Johnson said. “They would rather be with other greyhounds. I call them ‘breed snobs,’ but we place them in homes with other breeds of dogs all the time. Greyhounds will do much better in a home with any breed of dog than they will by themselves.”

Interested people should head to the website and fill out an application. The process usually goes fairly quickly, as the longer the greyhounds’ stay with Kelly, the harder the transition will be on them.

If you have some extra blankets you need to get rid of, she’d be happy to take them. Greyhounds are big fans of blankets, so they can go through them fairly quickly. Call the number on the website for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is the United States up for sale?

Why is the United States up for sale?

Foreign companies are quietly buying up farmland is the desert southwest to grow crops to send back to their own countries. Is this good for America? Are the United States really up for sale?

We have an awful lot of valuable natural resources in the United States, but there are two I’d like to draw your attention to specifically: Land and water. One we as human beings absolutely cannot live without, and one they aren’t making any more of. I’ll let you puzzle out which is which.

The reason I’m bringing this up is disconcerting to me. I’ve come across many articles online that report farmland in some of our most drought-stricken areas is being very quietly snapped up by foreign countries like Saudi Arabia. I bet you haven’t heard much about that in the national “news media,” have you?

Before you tell me, “You can’t believe everything you read online,” let me point out something: I know that. But let me teach you a little bit of journalism 101. If there’s enough smoke surrounding a story, there’s a fire in there somewhere. You just have to take the time to find it.

The way these companies’ are going about buying the land makes me fearful about the cost of our own natural resources, and let me explain why.

Have you heard of a business in Saudi Arabia called the Almarai Company? According to Reuters, in January of this year, they quietly purchased almost $32 million worth of land in California, a state that is suffering through years of drought. This is relevant because Almarai is the largest diary company in Saudi, and they want to grow alfalfa, one of the thirstiest crops in all of modern agriculture.

That is not good news for a state in it’s fourth year of drought so severe that residents and businesses who actually live and work in the state have to curtail water usage. And did I mention, estimates are the drought cost the state’s economy $2.74 billion dollars? Oh, and farmers had to literally plow under well over a half million acres of land because of dryness and the difficulty of getting enough water to irrigate the land.

The foreign land grab doesn’t just stop in California, either.

Just outside of Phoenix, Arizona, there’s a large farm that Almarai also bought for the purpose of growing hay and sending it back home. National Public Radio said the farm is roughly 15 square miles wide. That’s an acre total in the thousands, all to grow hay to send back to their country’s dairy cattle. So, why the rush to buy our land and use our water, you ask?

NPR reports the thing you may not know is Saudi Arabia used to grow it’s own alfalfa. But they ran into a problem. They used to sit on top of a huge natural aquifer, but due to poor management, it dried up. Ancient spring you may have read about in the Bible dried up. Only 50 years ago, the aquifer still contained enough water to fill Lake Erie.

As a result of mismanagement and greed, Saudi Arabia has drained it’s water supplies, and how they’re quietly buying up farmland in the southwest, right on the Arizona/California border. Tell me why this is a good thing?

Oh, and before you ask about laws regulating water usage, they only apply to local and domestic operations. Plus, it’s rather convenient that many of the areas being bought up don’t have water usage regulations in place yet? Is that a coincidence? If I’m looking for a place to grow alfalfa, which needs a lot of water to grow, I’m looking for places where I don’t have to worry about it. Wouldn’t you do the same?

So, how is this possible? In a word: Greed. And you can’t mention the word greed without talking about Washington, D.C., can you?

Our “leadership” passed an omnibus-spending bill last year. Yournewswire.com quoted Rand Paul as saying it was thousands of pages, “which no one read.” It’s too bad, because there was a little time bomb written into it that made foreign land grabbing even more possible.

Have you heard of the 1980 Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act (FIRPTA)? It required all foreign investors to pay taxes on what they acquired in the US. Guess what? Because of that little time bomb, that went away. That used to protect Americans (the people that live here?) from property taxes that went through the roof. It doesn’t do that anymore.

Now that the law is overthrown (not just by the President, either), foreign pension funds can now buy American real estate similar to what their United States counterparts can, and not face any financial repercussions.

So, what does the foreign takeover of these United States lands mean for the little folks like you and me?

I’ve just given you a blueprint on how to takeover a country, and do it legally. You get to the people that make laws in a particular country, you pay them enough to bend the laws to your favor, and you start buying. Okay?

So, if you buy enough land, and water, eventually you start to control the country. And when that happens, we’re in big trouble. The evidence is out there. Our politicians are bought and paid for, and our country is BEING bought and paid for.

It’ll take time, but it’s coming. Call me a conspiracy theorist? Fine. Do the research yourself.

I can’t figure out why this stuff is happening right in front of Americans, but we CHOOSE not to see it? Is that the ostrich gene taking over? Stick your head in the sand, and hope it goes away? It’s not.

Officials from other countries have been quoted directly as saying, “We will use your own laws against you.” They’re doing a bang up job so far.

 

MUSLIM IMMIGRANT: “PRAISE ALLAH! WE’RE GOING TO BE THE MAJORITY SOON!” (VIDEO)

 

What do we do, America?