Minnesota FFA Convention April 23-25th

Next week, the University of Minnesota (UMN) St. Paul campus will be flooded with a sea of blue jackets, as nearly 4,000 student members gather for the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention, April 23-25.

Minnesota FFA

The blue jackets are about to descend on the University of Minnesota for the State FFA Convention April23-25 at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Sciences on the St. Paul Campus. (photo from Rachel Marthaler Photography.)

During the convention, Minnesota FFA members compete in career development contests, attend sessions and workshops and receive awards for their FFA achievements. At this three-day event, high school FFA members also are introduced to the UMN community.

FFA is a national organization founded in 1928 that recognizes and supports the interests of food, fiber and natural resource industries and encompasses science, business and technology as it is applied to production agriculture. There are 30 different career development events (CDE) that students will compete in at the Minnesota FFA convention. The events include everything from forestry to agricultural sales. The FFA CDEs are just as diverse as the UMN’s College of Food,Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) majors.

At the convention, FFA members meet UMN students, faculty and professors who are helping with competitions, workshops and other convention activities.

“The first time I came to the University of Minnesota was with my FFA chapter for convention,”said Wendy Bauman, FFA member from Kerkhoven Murdock Sunburg (KMS) Chapter. “Now I’m a freshman in CFANS studying agricultural education. FFA is what introduced me to the University of Minnesota and is the reason why I chose this school and major.”

Many University of Minnesota CFANS students share a similar story. Many past Minnesota FFA members have found a home on the St. Paul campus. The partnership between CFANS and Minnesota FFA has strengthened both organizations as they work toward a similar mission of preparing future leaders for their careers.

“Minnesota FFA plays a key role in youth development and leadership across the state,” said CFANS Dean Brian Buhr. “We are fortunate to have a strong relationship that benefits our programs and departments.”

Visit mnffa.org for more details about the 88th Minnesota FFA convention. Follow along on social media or watch the general sessions mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming.

Wondering just what kind of impact Minnesota FFA can make on students?

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About University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

The University of Minnesota’s College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), is one of the world’s leading research, education and outreach institutions in the natural resources, food and agricultural sciences. Its faculty, staff and students are dedicated to the enhancement and preservation of the world’s food supplies and natural resources. CFANS provides students the opportunity to enter career fields with some of the best job outlooks in the country, including 13 undergraduate majors and over 25 minors ranging from agricultural education and marketing communications to conservation biology and forest and natural resource management, to health and nutrition, and the future of food and agriculture management with a focus in business and technology. As part of this launch, the University will offer enhanced scholarships to Minnesota students, add additional recruitment events in Greater Minnesota and expand outreach to high school counselors and career centers across Minnesota.

About Minnesota FFA

 The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information.

 

 

Pork Producers applaud White House on GIPSA action

GIPSA The Trump administration today gave notice that it will further delay the effective date of a GIPSA regulation related to the buying and selling of livestock, a move applauded by the National Pork Producers Council, which opposes the Obama-era rule. It also will take public comments on what to do with the regulation.

The so-called Farmer Fair Practices Rules, written by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), includes two proposed regulations and an interim final rule, the latter of which now is set to become effective Oct. 19.

“We’re extremely pleased that the Trump administration has extended the time it has to review this regulation and the public comments on it, which will show the devastating effects this rule would have on America’s pork producers,” said NPPC President Ken Maschhoff, a pork producer from Carlyle, Ill. “The regulation likely would restrict the buying and selling of livestock, lead to consolidation of the livestock industry – putting farmers out of business – and increase consumer prices for meat.”

GIPSA

National Pork Producers Council President Ken Maschoff says his group is happy with the White House decision to delay the effective date of  new GIPSA rules regarding the buying and selling of livestock. (photo courtesy of National Hog Farmer)

A notice in tomorrow’s Federal Register will indicate USDA is delaying the April 22 effective date for the interim final rule by 180 days and setting a 60-day comment period – from April 12 to June 10 – on whether to further delay or withdraw it. Just days into his presidency, President Trump extended for 60 days the public comment deadline on and Feb. 21 effective date of the Farmer Fair Practices Rules.

“The administration recognizes the importance of this issue to livestock farmers,” Maschhoff said, “and it’s following through with its pledge to look at regulations that would negatively affect people and the economy. Now we need to withdraw this bad regulation.”

NPPC is most concerned with the interim final rule, which would broaden the scope of the Packers and Stockyards Act (PSA) of 1921 related to using “unfair, unjustly discriminatory or deceptive practices” and to giving “undue or unreasonable preferences or advantages.” Specifically, the regulation would deem such actions per se violations of federal law even if they didn’t harm competition or cause competitive injury, prerequisites for winning PSA cases.

USDA in 2010 proposed several PSA provisions – collectively known as the GIPSA Rule – that Congress mandated in the 2008 Farm Bill; eliminating the need to prove a competitive injury to win a PSA lawsuit was not one of them. In fact, Congress rejected such a “no competitive injury” provision during debate on the Farm Bill. Additionally, eight federal appeals courts have held that harm to competition must be an element of a PSA case.

“Eliminating the need to prove injury to competition would prompt an explosion in PSA lawsuits by turning every contract dispute into a federal case subject to triple damages,” Maschhoff said. “The inevitable costs associated with that and the legal uncertainty it would create could lead to further vertical integration of our industry and drive packers to own more of their own hogs.

“That would reduce competition, stifle innovation and provide no benefits to anyone other than trial lawyers and activist groups that will use the rule to attack the livestock industry. For those reasons, we’re asking the administration to withdraw the rule.”

An Informa Economics study found that the GIPSA Rule today would cost the U.S. pork industry more than $420 million annually – more than $4 per hog – with most of the costs related to PSA lawsuits brought under the “no competitive injury” provision included in the interim final rule.

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NPPC is the global voice for the U.S. pork industry, protecting the livelihoods of America’s 60,000 pork producers, who abide by ethical principles in caring for their animals, in protecting the environment and public health and in providing safe, wholesome, nutritious pork products to consumers worldwide. For more information, visit www.nppc.org.

Cattle feedlot labor pains getting worse

Labor pains are a good way to describe the work situation in production agriculture, but it’s not a shortage of jobs that are the problem. More and more sectors in production agriculture are having a hard time finding help and the problem runs from coast to coast. Reports abound of crops left rotting in the fields because of a shortage of available labor to get out and harvest. The labor shortages aren’t just limited to crops, either. Feedlots across the country are having a hard time finding people to work with their livestock. The labor pains have gotten progressively worse in feedlots during the past decade.

“It is a problem,” said Gary Ruskamp of Ruskamp Feed Yards in Dodge, Nebraska. “I finally just got my crew filled in again. They kind of come and go after a couple of years and then you must find new people. I’ve got all good guys now, but it’s tough.”

Labor pains cattle feedlots

Labor pains are growing in the cattle feedlot industry as qualified help is getting harder and harder to find. (photo from silverspurranches.com)

Ruskamp has a stack of applicants every time he has an open position. But the problem is almost none of the applicants are qualified to do the job. The labor shortage is real in feedlot country and there are some good reasons behind it.

“I have a son that’s a partner with me in the feed yard,” Ruskamp said, “but a lot of families have kids that don’t stay on the farm. Plus, there’s less number of kids born on the farm. If you hire someone that didn’t grow up on a farm, you have to train them. They often don’t have the ability to work with livestock and the equipment we work with.”

He added, “There’s nobody that grows up on a farm anymore. It’s changed. Fewer farms. Fewer children on farms. They go to the city to work. The kids don’t come back out here and work in feedlots. There are a few family feed yards where the son might come back and work with them, but not a lot of that is going on.”

Ruskamp tries to hire local folks for open positions but occasionally has had to cast his net far and wide for employees. However, there’s a challenge when hiring people who aren’t from the area.

“I try to stay local,” he said, “because when you hire someone from further off, they usually want to get back home at some point. They don’t usually stay as long as somebody local.”

The labor shortage is worse in some counties than others. In the northern part of Cuming county, there’s a lot more feedlots that are closer together. He said workers can skip from feedlot to feedlot, working at one for two or three years.

“If they get 50 cents an hour more,” Ruskamp said, “they’ll skip to another feed yard. Eventually, they’ll come back to the first feedlot they were at.”

The struggle for labor isn’t hitting every feedlot in the plains. Ron Coufal runs a feedlot 14 miles west of West Point, Nebraska. He has a lot of family working in the business with him so the labor situation is in good shape there. However, that’s the exception rather than the rule in most feedlots.

“Our operation consists of all family members,” Coufal said. “My sons, my brothers, and a couple nephews all work here. All told, there are nine families that make a living out of this operation. We farm quite a bit of ground and we also feed quite a few cattle.”

Coufal said it’s always a problem hiring people, specifically the right ones for the job. It can be hard to pay people what they’re worth in agriculture these days with low cattle prices. That makes it tough for would-be employers because Coufal said you need to be able to pay people in order to hire the right people for the job.

“The right kind of people are typically in business for themselves or working for corporations somewhere else,” he said. “You can always hire a body but it can be hard to find one with the brain that allows them to do the job.

“If you want to work in the livestock industry,” Coufal said, “you have to be there every day. If 8:00 in the morning is when we feed cattle, I want them fed right at 8:00 in the morning. If it’s 10:00 in the morning, then I want them fed at ten. I want them on a schedule.”

Coufal said they did hire outside help before his sons came back from college. It took a lot of work to find good people. He enjoyed the staff he worked with before it became a family operation again, but did note that good help is getting harder to find.

If you know someone that’s possibly interested in working on a livestock operation, this is what it entails. There are opportunities there for people willing to work hard and learn the trade:

 

 

MN Cattlemen and Women Meet for 2016 Annual Convention

More than 300 cattlemen, cattlewomen & cattle industry members gathered in Bloomington, MN for the 2016 Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention. This premier policy & educational event in the Minnesota cattle industry featured speakers and an industry leading tradeshow that gives cattlemen and women the tools to connect, learn and innovate into 2017.

“This year’s convention was a fantastic event.  I was very happy to see a great turn out for from both MSCA members, as well as political leaders” – MSCA newly elected President Krist Wollum.

Minnesota state Cattlemen and Cattlemen’s convention

Krist Wollum of Porter, MN was elected to lead MSCA as President for 2017 & 2018.

During general sessions, attendees had the opportunity to learn about new and innovative ways to connect with the consumer, as well as cattle focused economic and political summaries for 2016.

Convention goers also heard from state and national cattle industry and political leaders about current efforts to grow and defend the cattle industry in Minnesota and across the country.

Political leaders including Lt. Governor Tina Smith, Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) Commissioner Dave Frederickson and Senator Amy Klobuchar shared their efforts to defend the agriculture industry on behalf of Minnesota farmers and Ranchers in St. Paul and Washington, D.C.

Members of the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association (MSCA) resolution committee set new policy on buffers, deer, health insurance, and agency programs.

Attendees of the 2016 MSCA Cattlemen’s College had the opportunity to listen and interact with some of the most influential regional & national experts in the beef industry. Topics included Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) assessment programs, third-party audits, consumer trust and on-farm BQA best management practices. This program, sponsored by Zoetis, was a joint effort between the National BQA program, the Minnesota Beef Council, IMI Global and Wulf Cattle.

Cattle producers also had the opportunity to engage with various government agencies to learn more about programs to open additional state and federal owned land for public grazing, along with best management practices to implement livestock into cropping operations with the use of cover crops.  This workshop was a joint effort between the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR), MSCA, The US Fish and Wildlife Service and Prairie Creek Seeds.

Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Convention Cattlemen

Dan Anderson of Roseau, MN was selected as the 2016 Minnesota Cattlemen of the year. (Contributed photo)

During Friday evening’s banquet, Dan Anderson of Roseau, MN, was recognized as the 2016 Minnesota Cattlemen of the year for his efforts to assist cattlemen in his region and across the state with issues impacting their herd health.  He has also been a leader in assisting fellow cattlemen in dealing with wildlife issues impacting their farm’s profitability and an exceptional leader in his dedication to growing MSCA membership.

The Minnesota Corn Growers Association was named the 2016 Beef Industry Service Award recipient for their efforts to support and grow the livestock industry in Minnesota.

Newly elected leadership included Grant Binford, Luverne as Feeder Council Chairmen and Jim Wulf, Starbuck as Cow/Calf Council Chairmen.  Newly elected regional directors include, Dan Anderson, Roseau – Region 1, Darvi Keehr, Little Falls – Region 5, Warren Jansma, Ellsworth – Region 7 and Frank Brand, Lake City – Region 9.  The MSCA executive committee for 2017-2018 will consist of Krist Wollum, Porter as President, Mike Landuyt, Walnut Grove as President-Elect and Grant Breitkreutz, Redwood Falls as Vice President. Glen Graff, Sandborn was selected by the president to serve as MSCA’s Legislative Chairmen.

“I’m very excited about the level of professionalism we have in our newly elected board of directors.  Each one of them brings a new and focused perspective of Minnesota’s cattle industry.” Krist Wollum, MSCA President

 About the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association

The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association (MSCA) is a membership-based organization that represents cattle farmers and individuals who are part of the cattle community in Minnesota.

 

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State Climatologist talks southeast MN weather

The weather throughout fall and during the transition to winter can only be described as interesting. It’s been awhile since I was doing play-by-play for a high school football game during early November and actually had to take my winter jacket off because the press box was actually quite comfortable. I would imagine outside chores have been much less taxing during the nice fall weather too.

Conditions are going to change at some point. We know that here in southeast Minnesota. Colder weather and snow will be coming starting next week, but the question is how cold and how much?

State Climatologist Mark Seeley talks southeast Minnesota weather

Mark Seeley is a climatologist with the University of Minnesota’s Department of Soil, Water, and Climate. (photo from mprnews.org)

Mark Seeley of the University of Minnesota Department of Soil, Water, and Climate. He’s a professor, a climatologist, and the main guy Minnesota media has turned to with weather questions for decades. I first met Mark while at KLGR radio in Redwood Falls. He was at the annual Farmfest event down the road near Morgan, Minnesota, and a fellow broadcaster said I needed to talk to Mark if I wanted to do a weather segment.

My most recent weather assignment comes from my freelance reporting job with Bluff Country News Group. We wanted to know what the upcoming winter would look like so I gave Mark a call and had a visit. The 2016 calendar year weather conditions in southeast Minnesota have been record-setting, with too much heat and moisture. I wanted to know how much heat and moisture have hit the area and this is what Mark had to say:

Farm Bureau Opposes Speed Limiters Proposal

Speed limitersThe United States Department of Transportation’s (DOT) proposal to require speed limiters for large commercial vehicles doesn’t account for the fact that many commercial vehicles often cover hundreds of miles on open roads with few other vehicles around. The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF)  recently submitted comments on the idea, saying the proposed rule would pass on significant costs to farmers and ranchers who only use heavier trucks seasonally.

Speed Limiters

The US Transportation Department is proposing the addition of speed limiters on vehicles with a gross weight greater than 26,000 pounds, which would mean more costs to farmers who only use those larger vehicles seasonally. (Photo from truckernews.com)

The proposed rule was put forth by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and DOT. The new rule would require vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,000 pounds to be equipped with a speed limiting device. It would be set to a speed to be specified when the final rule comes out. It would require motor carriers operating such vehicles in interstate commerce to maintain functional speed limiting devices at all times.

The AFBF says speed limits should not be arbitrarily established by federal rule. Instead, it should be based on conditions in the area in which it’s posted.

“The proposal ignores the fact that many commercial vehicles often operate for hundreds of miles without much interaction with other traffic. There is no clear rationale in the rule for suggesting a truck traveling in a rural setting with minimal traffic should have the same top speed as a truck traveling in a large city,” said AFBF.

The organization also points out that the proposal would be too costly for farmers and ranchers who use large trucks only during certain times of the year.

“If adopted, the rule would pass on significant costs to our members who do not operate as commercial motor vehicle enterprises but only utilize heavier trucks seasonally. These costs would impact an industry that is currently struggling to make ends meet with the recent downturn in the farm economy,” said AFBF.

Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention Registration Open

The Minnesota Cattle Industry convention is an event that brings together producers and beef industry partners for educational opportunities, policy discussion and development, and a cattle focused trade show.  The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association, along with the Minnesota Cattle women and the Minnesota Beef Council, will host the Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention and trade show December 1st – 3rd, 2016 at the Double Tree Hotel in Bloomington, MN.

Minnesota Cattle industry convention

The Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention is coming up on December 2 and 3 at the Double Tree Hotel in Bloomington, MN (Pic provided by the MN State Cattlemen’s Association)

The convention will kick off with “Mom at the Meat Counter” Janeal Yancy –PhD Meat Scientist and professor at Arkansas State University, mom and beef industry advocate blogger speaking about consumer engagement and the need for science based facts.

National association leadership will also be joining us in welcoming everyone to the convention, including NCBA President Tracey Bruner – Ramona, KS and ANCW President Penny Zimmerman – Foley, MN. 

The 2016 Cattlemen’s College speakers will focus on the need for self and third party evaluations as part of an increased need for on farm transparency.  These speakers will include Josh White – NCBA Director of Producer Education – Denver, CO, IMI Global – Castle Rock, CO and Wulf Cattle or Morris, MN.  

Friday will also include a public grazing workshop featuring a team of speakers from the Minnesota DNR and the USFWS, along with Cody Nelson of Prairie Creek Seeds discussing strategies for integrating livestock into cover crops.  

Friday’s events will round out with the 2016 Best of Beef Banquet highlighting many of the successes from 2016 and recognizing the best of the best from Minnesota’s beef industry.  The entertainment for the night will be Jerry Carrol: Farmer, Comedian & Agriculture Speaker from Raleigh, NC.  The evening will wrap up the MSCA’s annual live auction.

Saturday’s events will include the 2016 Breakfast Briefing featuring MSCA’s and NCBA’s policy work in 2016 and set the stage for policy priorities for 2017.  This session will feature Bruce Kleven – MSCA Legislative Advisor and Colin Woodal – Sr. Vice President of Government Affairs, NCBA – Washington D.C.

The convention will round out with a Beef Market Status Round Table featuring Jeff Stolle – Nebraska Cattlemen’s Association Marketing Program Manager – Lincoln, NE, Micheal Klamm – USDA-NASS – Washington D.C. and Brad Kooima – Kooima and Kaemingk Commodities, Inc. – Sioux Center, IA.

Registration and room reservation information is available at www.mnsca.org or in the November edition of the Minnesota Cattleman newspaper.  The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Convention and Trade show block will be held until November 10th, 2015. Exhibitors and vendors are also encouraged to attend, sponsorship opportunity details available at www.mnsca.org or call 612-618-6619 with questions.

We look forward to you joining us in December!

2016-2017 Minnesota Beef Ambassador Team Announced

The Minnesota Beef Industry is proud to announce that Katie Moller of Princeton, daughter of Scott and Julie Moller, Abbey Schiefelbein of Kimball, daughter of Don and Jennifer Schiefelbien, and Zach Klaers of Arlington, son of Pat and Sandy Klaers were chosen as 2016-2017 Senior Minnesota Beef Ambassador Team Members. The 2016-2017 Junior Minnesota Beef Ambassador team includes: Emilee White of Wadena, daughter of Don and Tonja White; and Bailee Schiefelbein of Kimball, daughter of Don and Jennifer Schiefelbein.

Beef Ambassadors

The Minnesota Beef Industry is proud to announce the Minnesota Beef Ambassador team comprised of (left to right): Bailee Schiefelbein, Emilee White; Jr. Beef Ambassadors, Katie Moller, Sr. Beef Ambassador Team Lead; Zach Klaers and Abbey Schiefelbein, Sr. Beef Ambassadors. The Beef Ambassadors will work throughout the state to assist with various promotion and education programs related to beef. (Photo from Minnesota Beef)

Contestants from all over the state of Minnesota competed for a place on this year’s Beef Ambassador Team and a chance to win cash prizes sponsored by the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association and the Minnesota Cattlewomen’s Association, with additional sponsorship funds courtesy of the Beef Checkoff Program.

The contest took place during the Minnesota Beef Expo held on Saturday, October 22, 2016 at the CHS Miracle of Birth Center at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds.During the contest all contestants were required to prepare a written blog or social media post on a beef industry topic.

Contestants were scored by judges on their ability to incorporate beef industry information and the relatability of the message with consumers. Throughout the contest, contestants also were judged on their “elevator speech, “a short, to the point, statement outlining his/her message to consumers and what he/she wants consumers to know about the beef industry.

Additionally, contestants competed in a mock radio interview, which observed the contestants ability to “Tell the Beef Production Story and present beef and farming in a positive light, a mock consumer promotion, which observed the contestants ability to educate the consumer about beef and the beef product, and a written response, which observed the contestants ability to thoughtfully answer and identify misinformation about beef.

About the Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program

The Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program provides an opportunity for youth ages 13-19 to educate consumers and students about beef nutrition, food safety and stewardship practices of beef farmers and ranchers. The Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program is funded through support from the Minnesota CattleWomen’s Association, Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program. 

 

China lifts 13-year old U.S. beef imports ban

Restoring American beef imports to China is a top priority for U.S. farmers because they want to take advantage of the country’s growing demand for meat.

But there are some conditions attached. Beef older than 30 months will still be barred, and U.S. exports will have to comply with China’s traceability and quarantine rules. China’s agriculture ministry did not say when beef imports would resume.

The U.S. Meat Export Federation called the announcement an “important first step.”

China first imposed a beef embargo in 2001 in response to mad cow disease in Europe. The agriculture ministry announced the ban would include American beef after the disease appeared in the U.S. in 2003.

China beef imports

 

The U.S. exports over 1 million metric tons of beef a year, worth $6.3 billion. Mexico is its largest export market, followed by Japan, South Korea, and Canada.

Here’s another edition of the ChadSmithMedia weekly podcast talking beef:

 

China is already the world’s second-biggest beef buyer. Imports grew roughly 10 times between 2010 and 2015, according to the U.S. meat export federation.

Demand for imported meat is growing in China as the country’s middle class gets richer, and domestic farmers can’t keep pace.

U.S. meat producers are hoping to return to China with a big bang. Australia, Uruguay, and New Zealand are currently the top exporters of beef to China.

 

MFU thanks delegation for addressing dairy concerns

Minnesota-Farmers-Union-Logo-ApprovedMinnesota Farmers Union (MFU) would like to thank Senators Franken and Klobuchar as well as Representatives Peterson, Nolan, and Walz  for joining 60 of their colleagues in signing on to a bi-partisan Congressional letter to USDA Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.  The letter expressed concern about the troubling economic challenges facing U.S. dairy farmers and urged him to assist them as quickly as possible.

The letter, spearheaded by Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy and Connecticut Representative Joe Courtney, cited that farm milk prices dropping 40 percent since 2014.  Compounding the problem of low prices, the nation’s cheese stocks were recorded at their highest level since the data was first recorded in 1917. The letter also says that current expectations are that the dairy market will continue to struggle

“MFU has been in constant contact with our Congressional delegation working on assistance for Minnesota dairy farmers, and MFU appreciates the effort of these members of Congress,” said MFU President Doug Peterson.

dairy industry struggles

The Minnesota Farmers Union thanked its congressional delegation for signing onto a letter urging the USDA to take action to help the nation’s struggling dairy farmers. (Jackson Forderer for MPR News)

The members of Congress in the letter urge the USDA to use its secretarial authority and look to past precedent for ways to take action to protect all of our nation’s dairy farmers from any further crisis.  The letter also urges the USDA to aid in the expansion and maintenance of domestic markets. The letter further urges the USDA to take all actions available in order to make an immediate market injection and offer financial assistance that will support dairy farmers.  They also caution USDA to not stimulate overproduction further than it’s already gone.

MFU will continue to work on dairy policy as we begin our annual county conventions throughout the state, making help for dairy farmers a top priority.

 

Minnesota Farmers Union, standing for agriculture, fighting for farmers (www.mfu.org).