75th Minnesota Farmers Union Convention in November

Minnesota Farmers Union

The Minnesota Farmers Union will have its annual convention on November November 19th and 20th at the Ramada Plaza in Minneapolis.

Minnesota Farmers Union (MFU) will be holding their 75th  annual state convention Saturday, November 19 and Sunday, November 20 at the Ramada Plaza in Minneapolis. The business of the convention is to debate and pass MFU policy and elect delegates to represent Minnesota Farmers Union at the National Farmers Union convention that will be held in San Diego, CA March 5-8, 2017.

Prior to the convention a retirement reception will be hosted by Minnesota Farmers Union Insurance Agency with guest speakers to highlight the career of MFU President Doug Peterson and to give thanks to all the hard work and dedication that he has done throughout his time with Farmers Union.

The Saturday evening banquet will highlight the past 75 years of Farmers Union and the strides that the organization has taken to protect and fight for family farmers and rural communities.

“Minnesota Farmers Union convention is member-driven policy discussion that will help guide us during our meetings with legislators at the State and Federal levels throughout the next year. Our grass-roots policy is strongly built during the discussions and debates that happen over these two days.” said Doug Peterson, Minnesota Farmers Union President. “Each of our member delegation has an opportunity to have their voice heard and to influence our policy discussion as we work for common sense and sound ag policies that are good for family farmers and rural communities.”

Speakers throughout the convention include: Alison O’Toole, CEO of MN Sure; Lance Boyer, Financial Products Manager and Kevin Reisler, Sales and Marketing Manager for Farmers Union Insurance; Dave Frederickson, Commission of Agriculture; Tim Rudnicki Executive Director for MN Bio Fuels Association; Jim Ennis Executive Director of Catholic Rural Life.  Multiple breakout sessions will be held Sunday morning, including a Dairy Issues meeting, Energy Issues Forum and a Whole Farm Revenue Insurance presentation.

You can find the full agenda at www.mfu.org. The Minnesota Farmers Union Convention will be held at the Ramada Plaza, 1330 Industrial Boulevard, Minneapolis.  Contact Amanda Valencia, MFU Communications Director, with any questions, 651.288.4068.

Minnesota Farmers Union, standing for agriculture, fighting for farmers (www.mfu.org).

November Weed of the Month: Palmer Amaranth

November’s Weed of the Month is Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). This fast growing weed has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action so it is difficult to control. Palmer amaranth produces a lot of seed, up to 250,000 per plant, and is highly competitive. It spreads quickly and will cause extensive corn and soybean crop losses.

Palmer amaranth is native to the arid southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. It was accidentally introduced to the southeastern United States and became the most troublesome weed in cotton production, by far. It developed resistance to many herbicides with multiple modes of action and spread to row crop fields in much of the eastern half of the country. This dreaded weed was discovered in Minnesota in 2016.

Palmer Amaranth weeds

Palmer amaranth plant with seed spikes. (photo provided by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.)

Palmer amaranth can be distinguished from closely related waterhemp and other pigweeds by a long petiole length and very tall flower and seed spikes. Unlike other pigweeds, Palmer petioles are often longer than the leaf blades. A petiole attaches a leaf to a stem. The flowering spike is much longer than that of other pigweeds. Leaves of some Palmer plants have a whitish V-shaped mark on them. Palmer amaranth is a summer annual that commonly reaches heights of 6-8 feet but can reach 10 feet.

If you find this plant, please report immediately by calling the Arrest the Pest at 888-545-6684 or emailing arrest.the.pest@state.mn.us.

Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention Registration Open

The Minnesota Cattle Industry convention is an event that brings together producers and beef industry partners for educational opportunities, policy discussion and development, and a cattle focused trade show.  The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association, along with the Minnesota Cattle women and the Minnesota Beef Council, will host the Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention and trade show December 1st – 3rd, 2016 at the Double Tree Hotel in Bloomington, MN.

Minnesota Cattle industry convention

The Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention is coming up on December 2 and 3 at the Double Tree Hotel in Bloomington, MN (Pic provided by the MN State Cattlemen’s Association)

The convention will kick off with “Mom at the Meat Counter” Janeal Yancy –PhD Meat Scientist and professor at Arkansas State University, mom and beef industry advocate blogger speaking about consumer engagement and the need for science based facts.

National association leadership will also be joining us in welcoming everyone to the convention, including NCBA President Tracey Bruner – Ramona, KS and ANCW President Penny Zimmerman – Foley, MN. 

The 2016 Cattlemen’s College speakers will focus on the need for self and third party evaluations as part of an increased need for on farm transparency.  These speakers will include Josh White – NCBA Director of Producer Education – Denver, CO, IMI Global – Castle Rock, CO and Wulf Cattle or Morris, MN.  

Friday will also include a public grazing workshop featuring a team of speakers from the Minnesota DNR and the USFWS, along with Cody Nelson of Prairie Creek Seeds discussing strategies for integrating livestock into cover crops.  

Friday’s events will round out with the 2016 Best of Beef Banquet highlighting many of the successes from 2016 and recognizing the best of the best from Minnesota’s beef industry.  The entertainment for the night will be Jerry Carrol: Farmer, Comedian & Agriculture Speaker from Raleigh, NC.  The evening will wrap up the MSCA’s annual live auction.

Saturday’s events will include the 2016 Breakfast Briefing featuring MSCA’s and NCBA’s policy work in 2016 and set the stage for policy priorities for 2017.  This session will feature Bruce Kleven – MSCA Legislative Advisor and Colin Woodal – Sr. Vice President of Government Affairs, NCBA – Washington D.C.

The convention will round out with a Beef Market Status Round Table featuring Jeff Stolle – Nebraska Cattlemen’s Association Marketing Program Manager – Lincoln, NE, Micheal Klamm – USDA-NASS – Washington D.C. and Brad Kooima – Kooima and Kaemingk Commodities, Inc. – Sioux Center, IA.

Registration and room reservation information is available at www.mnsca.org or in the November edition of the Minnesota Cattleman newspaper.  The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Convention and Trade show block will be held until November 10th, 2015. Exhibitors and vendors are also encouraged to attend, sponsorship opportunity details available at www.mnsca.org or call 612-618-6619 with questions.

We look forward to you joining us in December!

2016-2017 Minnesota Beef Ambassador Team Announced

The Minnesota Beef Industry is proud to announce that Katie Moller of Princeton, daughter of Scott and Julie Moller, Abbey Schiefelbein of Kimball, daughter of Don and Jennifer Schiefelbien, and Zach Klaers of Arlington, son of Pat and Sandy Klaers were chosen as 2016-2017 Senior Minnesota Beef Ambassador Team Members. The 2016-2017 Junior Minnesota Beef Ambassador team includes: Emilee White of Wadena, daughter of Don and Tonja White; and Bailee Schiefelbein of Kimball, daughter of Don and Jennifer Schiefelbein.

Beef Ambassadors

The Minnesota Beef Industry is proud to announce the Minnesota Beef Ambassador team comprised of (left to right): Bailee Schiefelbein, Emilee White; Jr. Beef Ambassadors, Katie Moller, Sr. Beef Ambassador Team Lead; Zach Klaers and Abbey Schiefelbein, Sr. Beef Ambassadors. The Beef Ambassadors will work throughout the state to assist with various promotion and education programs related to beef. (Photo from Minnesota Beef)

Contestants from all over the state of Minnesota competed for a place on this year’s Beef Ambassador Team and a chance to win cash prizes sponsored by the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association and the Minnesota Cattlewomen’s Association, with additional sponsorship funds courtesy of the Beef Checkoff Program.

The contest took place during the Minnesota Beef Expo held on Saturday, October 22, 2016 at the CHS Miracle of Birth Center at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds.During the contest all contestants were required to prepare a written blog or social media post on a beef industry topic.

Contestants were scored by judges on their ability to incorporate beef industry information and the relatability of the message with consumers. Throughout the contest, contestants also were judged on their “elevator speech, “a short, to the point, statement outlining his/her message to consumers and what he/she wants consumers to know about the beef industry.

Additionally, contestants competed in a mock radio interview, which observed the contestants ability to “Tell the Beef Production Story and present beef and farming in a positive light, a mock consumer promotion, which observed the contestants ability to educate the consumer about beef and the beef product, and a written response, which observed the contestants ability to thoughtfully answer and identify misinformation about beef.

About the Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program

The Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program provides an opportunity for youth ages 13-19 to educate consumers and students about beef nutrition, food safety and stewardship practices of beef farmers and ranchers. The Minnesota Beef Ambassador Program is funded through support from the Minnesota CattleWomen’s Association, Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program. 

 

EWG: voluntary conservation isn’t enough

Seven years in the making, EWG’s Conservation Database allows Americans to see exactly where billions of dollars in conservation funding have gone. The data obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, is broken down by county.

“Used wisely and with the right incentives, farm conservation programs are making a difference in protecting our health, and improving our quality of life and the environment,” said Craig Cox, EWG Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources. “But we need to focus taxpayer dollars on getting the most effective practices in the right places to address the most urgent threats.”

Data obtained by the EWG through FOIA requests show where federal conservation dollars have been spent on projects, including cover crops.

Data obtained by the EWG through FOIA requests show where federal conservation dollars have been spent on projects, including cover crops.

The data, obtained through 28 FOIA requests over seven years, show that since 2005 farmers and landowners have received $29.8 billion in payments through four initiatives funded by Congress and administered by USDA.

-Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, $318 million

-Conservation Reserve Program, $20 billion

-Environmental Quality Incentives Program, $7.4 billion

-Conservation Stewardship Program, $2.2 billion

The data confirm the growing recognition that voluntary programs alone are insufficient. Voluntary programs in the federal farm bill can play an important role, but they aren’t leading to clean water, clean air and a healthy environment.

“It’s more than fair to expect farmers and landowners to do more to protect the environment in return for the generous farm and insurance subsidies they receive,” Cox said. “Americans across the country are seeing the price of farm pollution firsthand. It’s time for Congress to deliver a return on their tax dollars by requiring farmers who take money from these programs to do more to protect the environment and public health.”

Source: EWG

This article can be found at farmfutures.com

Zero-interest loans for farmers with flooding damage

The Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) has lowered its interest rate on the Disaster Loan program to zero percent to help farmers cover the costs to replace and repair items lost or damaged due to flooding and not covered by insurance.

flooding, floods, disaster

Farmers with flooding in their fields may be eligible for help with zero interest loans available from the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority. (photo from farmindustrynews.com)

As with other RFA loans, the Disaster Loan program will be available for farmers through their existing agricultural lenders for financing for these repairs. The loans can be used to help clean up, repair, or replace farm structures and to replace seed, other crop inputs, feed, and livestock. The loan may also be used to repair and restore farm real estate that was damaged by flooding. The RFA participation is limited to 45 percent of the principal amount up to a maximum of $200,000.

The loans will be offered in the following 23 counties that have been declared a disaster by the Governor due to flooding conditions that started September 21, 2016 in Anoka, Blue Earth, Cottonwood, Dodge, Faribault, Freeborn, Goodhue, Hennepin, Houston, Le Sueur, Mower, Nicollet, Olmstead, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Sibley, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, Washington, and Winona counties.

“Minnesotans have a proud tradition of coming together to support one another after a disaster,” said Lt. Governor Tina Smith. “Providing zero interest loans to our ag producers will help them recover from severe weather and flooding. I encourage all eligible Minnesota farmers to apply for assistance.”

The RFA partners with local lenders to provide affordable credit to eligible farmers. Loan participations are purchased by the RFA under several programs that assist beginning farmers purchase agricultural land; finance improvements to the farm such as grain handling facilities, machine storage, and manure systems; help farmers reorganize their farm debt to improve cash flow; and, finance new livestock production facilities. Over $227 million has been invested in over 2,900 participations by the RFA in these programs.

Interested borrowers should contact their lender or call RFA at 651-201-6004. More information is also available on the RFA website at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/agfinance.

Biodiesel mandate lawsuit against Minnesota dismissed

Ruling in favor of biodiesel mandate paves way for boosting renewable fuels and strong soybean demand

The State of Minnesota, Minnesota soybean farmers, and biodiesel producers won a complete dismissal Thursday in the lawsuit challenging the state’s biodiesel mandate. The decision by Chief Judge John Tunheim of the U.S. District Court in Minneapolis clears the road for summer blends of B20 (20 percent biodiesel blend) in May 2018 and continues to provide numerous benefits for all Minnesotans while adding value to Minnesota soybeans.

biodiesel lawsuit

Minnesota Soybean growers and biodiesel producers won a complete dismissal of a lawsuit challenging the Minnesota Biodiesel Mandate, clearing the way for B20 blends in the future. (photo from oklahomafarmreport.com)

“We are very pleased to see the state and Minnesota Soybean’s motions were successful in dismissing the case against the state’s biodiesel mandate,” said Theresia Gillie, Minnesota Soybean Growers Association president. “Once again, Minnesota is at the forefront of energy independence and supporting renewable fuels.”

The current B10 blend equates to annually removing 128,000 passenger vehicles from Minnesota roads and is America’s only advanced biofuel. B20 will bring more value to soybeans as it has stimulated Minnesota’s agricultural economy. By increasing demand for Minnesota soybeans by 13 percent, soybean biodiesel generates an estimated $200 million in economic activity.

“The benefits serve all Minnesotans,” said Mike Youngerberg, Minnesota Soybean’s senior director of field services. “Biodiesel reduces our dependence on imported petroleum while increasing farmer profitability, creating green jobs and boosting economic growth in Minnesota.”

soybean biodiesel lawsuit

Boosting the soybean biodiesel blend is expected to increase demand for Minnesota soybeans by 13 percent.

The added bonus is biodiesel, since 2005, has significantly improved air quality in Minnesota, among other environmental benefits. This is a win for all Minnesotans.

In his ruling, Judge Tunheim ruled Minnesota’s mandate is not preempted by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Minnesota’s mandate actually creates demand  and works in conjunction with the current RFS.

“Nearly all engine manufacturers approve B20 for their engines and now Minnesotans are ready for the move to B20,” Gillie said. “We thank the State of Minnesota for their vehement defense of the biodiesel mandate.”

MSGA is a non-profit, farmer-controlled membership organization established in 1962. Its goal is to assure profitable soybean farming by influencing favorable ag legislation, monitoring government policies and supporting research and market development.

OSHA withdraws harmful fertilizer standards

U.S. Senator Heidi Heitkamp today announced that fertilizer retailers in North Dakota and across the country will not have to comply with harmful standards issued last year by the Administration. The standards – which the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) must withdraw – would have applied tough, across-the-board restrictions on agricultural retailers that sell anhydrous ammonia, a common fertilizer, seriously burdening retailers and farmers.

Fertilizer

The U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that fertilizer retailers don’t have to live under new storage requirements that the Administration tried to implement without input from farmers and the agriculture industry.

In a decision issued this morning, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the administration should have gone through a formal rulemaking process, seeking more meaningful input from farmers and fertilizer retailers. The Administration created the new standards in a July 2015 memorandum, and they became effective immediately. However, because of language Heitkamp helped include in the end-of-the-year spending bill Congress passed last December, OSHA postponed enforcement of the guidance until October 1, 2016.

“As I said yesterday at a hearing I helped lead, the administration should have listened to farmers, retailers, and rural communities before creating these standards – and today the courts agreed,” said Heitkamp. “This is a victory for rural communities whose economies rely on farmers’ accessing inputs like anhydrous ammonia fertilizer. Complying with those standards could have cost each facility up to $50,000, according to the North Dakota Department of Agriculture. More than 30 North Dakota retailers said they would have had to stop selling the fertilizer. With those huge impacts on our farmers, it was clear all along that there should have been a formal rulemaking process rather than just agency guidance with little input from those impacted.”

Fertilizer

Fall anhydrous applications aren’t that far away. The retailers that sell it don’t have to live under burdensome new regulations from OSHA, thanks to a decision on Friday from the U.S. Court of Appeals.

Just yesterday, Heitkamp pushed key administration officials for a solution on the standards, pointing out – as the court said in its decision today – that the proposed standards looked more like rulemaking than guidance. Heitkamp called on the administration to voluntarily delay enforcing the standards given the impact they would have on farmers and retailers. The new policy would have required facilities that store or transport 10,000 pounds or more of anhydrous ammonia to obtain Process Safety Management Standard documentation. If the facility could not obtain this documentation, it would have been forced to purchase new storage tanks, costing $70,000 or more.

OSHA did not choose the traditional notice-and-comment rulemaking process, which would have given retailers and farmers an opportunity for more meaningful consultation as the rule was developed, and instead issued interpretive guidance, which did not include substantial input from affected industries.

In July, Heitkamp and Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE) introduced bipartisan legislation to stop these harmful federal standards from going into effect. It would also require the agency to abide by a formal rulemaking process when instituting a similar policy change in the future. Click here to view text of the FARM Act.

 

 

Palmer amaranth detected in Minnesota

 ST. PAUL, Minn. – Crop scientists at the University of Minnesota and officials at the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) urge farmers to check fields for Palmer amaranth, an aggressive weed that can put corn and soybean crops at risk. A plant detected in a native seed planting plot on a Yellow Medicine County farm was confirmed today to be Palmer amaranth. This is the first confirmation of the weed in the state.

The MDA asks possible infestations to be reported by contacting the MDA’s Arrest the Pest line by phone at 1-888-545-6684 or by email at arrest.the.pest@state.mn.us. Landowners are encouraged to email photos of suspected infestations for identification.

“We encourage landowners to scout fields now before harvest for Palmer amaranth and report any possible infestations to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture,” said Geir Friisoe, MDA’s Director of Plant Protection. “The quicker we’re able to identify and start managing this weed, the better our chances will be to minimize the impact to our ag industry.”

Palmer amaranth

Palmer Amaranth has been found in Minnesota and the Department of Agriculture wants farmers to keep an eye on their fields to help nip this in the bud before an infestation can occur. (Photo by Bruce Potter)

 

Palmer amaranth can grow 2 to 3 inches a day, typically reaching 6 to 8 feet, or more, in height. Left uncontrolled, a single female Palmer amaranth plant typically produces 100,000 to 500,000 seeds. It is resistant to multiple herbicides.

It has been found in 28 other states, including Iowa, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

“Palmer amaranth infestations have caused substantial yield losses and greatly increased weed management costs in cotton, soybeans, and corn in the southern states,” said Extension agronomist and crops leader Jeff Gunsolus. “This is a disconcerting, though not completely unexpected, discovery in Minnesota. We have been discussing proper identification procedures with crop consultants over the last three or more years.”

Close-up of Palmer amaranth

Palmer Amaranth has been found in Minnesota fields and it’s important for farmers to watch their fields in order to avoid an outbreak in farm fields across the state. (Photo by Bruce Potter)

 

Extension and MDA officials commend the grower and crop consultant who quickly contacted Extension after discovering a suspected Palmer amaranth plant. The weed is on MDA’s prohibited-eradicated noxious weed list, requiring all above- and below-ground parts of the plant be destroyed. Transportation, propagation or sale of the plants is prohibited.

MDA and Extension continue coordinating action steps to address the weed.

The MDA is investigating how the weed may have been introduced to the state.

In August, an Extension blog updated steps for both prevention and management at z.umn.edu/palamthbknd.

Further information is available at z.umn.edu/MDAPalmerAmaranth.

MDA value added grants available for Minnesota agriculture

Value added agriculture grants are available from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Exporting soybeans overseas is one way to add value to Minnesota’s agricultural products. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture has grants available for adding value to all kinds of agricultural products. (photo from archive.constantcontact.com)

Value added to agriculture sustains the long-term success of the industry and The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) wants to ensure the industry’s future.  The MDA has up to $1 million in grants available through the competitive Value Added Grant Program. The grant was established to advance Minnesota’s agricultural and renewable energy industries through the Agricultural Growth, Research and Innovation (AGRI) Program.

The goal of the Value Added Grant is to increase sales of Minnesota agricultural products. Some of the ways to add value include  diversifying markets, increasing market access, and increasing food safety of value-added products.

Dave Frederickson supports value added agriculture in Minnesota

Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson notes that value added agriculture does a lot to support the state’s economy, including the off-farm sectors. (Photo from mda.state.mn.us)

“Value-added businesses benefit the state of Minnesota in lots of ways,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Dave Frederickson. “They utilize Minnesota grown agricultural products in creative ways and the extra sales revenues help support our state’s economy. It’s exciting to watch Minnesota entrepreneurs improve their businesses with funding from the Value Added Grant Program.”

New or established for-profit businesses may apply for funding to help with the development of value-added agricultural products.  Some of the ways value gets added to agricultural products include added processing, marketing, or manufacturing. Grant funds reimburse up to 25 percent of the total project cost.  The maximum award is $150,000 and the minimum grant is $1,000. Equipment purchases and facility improvements are also eligible ways to add value to agricultural products.

Applications must be received no later than 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 27, 2016. Applications are available at www.mda.state.mn.us/grants/grants/valueaddedgrant.aspx and may be submitted online, by mail, or in-person.