MN Cattlemen and Women Meet for 2016 Annual Convention

More than 300 cattlemen, cattlewomen & cattle industry members gathered in Bloomington, MN for the 2016 Minnesota Cattle Industry Convention. This premier policy & educational event in the Minnesota cattle industry featured speakers and an industry leading tradeshow that gives cattlemen and women the tools to connect, learn and innovate into 2017.

“This year’s convention was a fantastic event.  I was very happy to see a great turn out for from both MSCA members, as well as political leaders” – MSCA newly elected President Krist Wollum.

Minnesota state Cattlemen and Cattlemen’s convention

Krist Wollum of Porter, MN was elected to lead MSCA as President for 2017 & 2018.

During general sessions, attendees had the opportunity to learn about new and innovative ways to connect with the consumer, as well as cattle focused economic and political summaries for 2016.

Convention goers also heard from state and national cattle industry and political leaders about current efforts to grow and defend the cattle industry in Minnesota and across the country.

Political leaders including Lt. Governor Tina Smith, Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) Commissioner Dave Frederickson and Senator Amy Klobuchar shared their efforts to defend the agriculture industry on behalf of Minnesota farmers and Ranchers in St. Paul and Washington, D.C.

Members of the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association (MSCA) resolution committee set new policy on buffers, deer, health insurance, and agency programs.

Attendees of the 2016 MSCA Cattlemen’s College had the opportunity to listen and interact with some of the most influential regional & national experts in the beef industry. Topics included Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) assessment programs, third-party audits, consumer trust and on-farm BQA best management practices. This program, sponsored by Zoetis, was a joint effort between the National BQA program, the Minnesota Beef Council, IMI Global and Wulf Cattle.

Cattle producers also had the opportunity to engage with various government agencies to learn more about programs to open additional state and federal owned land for public grazing, along with best management practices to implement livestock into cropping operations with the use of cover crops.  This workshop was a joint effort between the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR), MSCA, The US Fish and Wildlife Service and Prairie Creek Seeds.

Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Convention Cattlemen

Dan Anderson of Roseau, MN was selected as the 2016 Minnesota Cattlemen of the year. (Contributed photo)

During Friday evening’s banquet, Dan Anderson of Roseau, MN, was recognized as the 2016 Minnesota Cattlemen of the year for his efforts to assist cattlemen in his region and across the state with issues impacting their herd health.  He has also been a leader in assisting fellow cattlemen in dealing with wildlife issues impacting their farm’s profitability and an exceptional leader in his dedication to growing MSCA membership.

The Minnesota Corn Growers Association was named the 2016 Beef Industry Service Award recipient for their efforts to support and grow the livestock industry in Minnesota.

Newly elected leadership included Grant Binford, Luverne as Feeder Council Chairmen and Jim Wulf, Starbuck as Cow/Calf Council Chairmen.  Newly elected regional directors include, Dan Anderson, Roseau – Region 1, Darvi Keehr, Little Falls – Region 5, Warren Jansma, Ellsworth – Region 7 and Frank Brand, Lake City – Region 9.  The MSCA executive committee for 2017-2018 will consist of Krist Wollum, Porter as President, Mike Landuyt, Walnut Grove as President-Elect and Grant Breitkreutz, Redwood Falls as Vice President. Glen Graff, Sandborn was selected by the president to serve as MSCA’s Legislative Chairmen.

“I’m very excited about the level of professionalism we have in our newly elected board of directors.  Each one of them brings a new and focused perspective of Minnesota’s cattle industry.” Krist Wollum, MSCA President

 About the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association

The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association (MSCA) is a membership-based organization that represents cattle farmers and individuals who are part of the cattle community in Minnesota.

 

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Miracle of Birth Center brings agriculture to the public

Miracle of Birth Center at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester, Minnesota

The Ag Star Miracle of Birth Center at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester gave the public a chance to get up close to animal agriculture, with the goal of educating the public on just where there food comes from and how it’s produced. (photo by Chad Smith)

As some people entered the Ag Star Miracle of Birth Center at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester, the sounds of a brand new calf, ten-day-old goats, and just-born piglets fighting for the best positions near mom to nurse brought back a flood of memories from living on a farm.

However, most of the people entering the Center didn’t have an agricultural background to draw on so it was a completely new experience for some of them.  That’s the reason Ag Star Financial and several local sponsors pooled their resources to bring the Center to life.  The goal is a simple one: to educate the public about agriculture.

“We have a lot of education stations in here for kids and adults too,” said Tracy Nelson, Miracle of Birthing Center Manager.  “People can get up close with hens that laid eggs and then watch the eggs hatch.  We also have baby chicks and ducklings they can touch.  We also have ten-day-old goat kids.”

Miracle of Birth Center at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester.

The Ag Star Miracle of Birth Center gave the public a chance to get up close and personal with ten-day-old goats and other animals found in American animal agriculture. (Photo by Chad Smith)

Ed Kuisle of Rochester brought the goats, and he said it’s been one of the most popular exhibits in the Center for one reason:  personality.  The goats are a novelty for the kids, and he said they have a lot of personalities already at just ten days old so kids really enjoy interacting with them.  The goats come from a big dairy farm down by Altura.

“The owner of the farm milks about 600 of them.  These goats are billies (male),” said Kuisle, who grew up working on a dairy farm near Rochester. “The owner of the farm feeds them out to 50-60 pounds and then sells them.  All the does stay on the farm for milking.”

Four sows were on display during the fair, and they were all expected to farrow.  One of the sows farrowed on Thursday morning and had ten brand new piglets.  The birthing didn’t stop there either.  A brand new Holstein calf was born on Thursday afternoon.  The bull took his first steps in front of an appreciative crowd shortly after 2:30.

Miracle of Birth Center in Rochester

The general public had a chance to watch a Holstein bull calf being born on Thursday afternoon, July 27, at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester as part of the Miracle of Birth Center. (photo by Chad Smith)

“We actually announce that we have a birthing going on over the public address system of the fair and it fills up,” Nelson said.  “There are a lot of people on the bleachers and standing around.  We even put it up on the TV’s here in the building and do some play-by-play for people in the building.”

Nelson said people ask lots of questions.  For example, they seem surprised at the size difference between a mother sow and her piglets.  Another question they get is how the little chicks could actually fit inside the eggs they hatch from.  They also think the size of the bigger animals is surprising.  And those kinds of questions are the reason the Center is in existence.

“The biggest purpose of the Center is to educate the public about animal agriculture,” Nelson said.  “It’s about giving people the experience of seeing live animals of different ages and sizes.  Whether they actually get to see a live birth or just come and see the animals here, they’re learning about animal agriculture.”

Nelson said Kuisle is one of many volunteers that make the Center possible.  Kuisle said with a smile on his face that he volunteers one week a year, and it’s at the county fair.  But he was quick to add that a project like the Miracle of Birthing Center has been very successful.

“It’s gone very well,” Kuisle said. “It was slow the first couple of days but it’s really picked up.  The goal is to expose young people to what happens on the farm.  Most children today can’t come out to a farm anymore so this type of project works out well here.”

Kuisle said he gets a lot of questions too.  Some of them include ‘are the animals born with teeth?  Are they boy or girl?’  And the biggest question he gets is ‘can I pet them?’

Miracle of Birth Center in Rochester

The Ag Star Miracle of Birth Center at the Olmsted County Fair in Rochester gave youngsters a chance to interact with live animals raised in American agriculture. (Photo by Chad Smith)

Nelson also grew up on a dairy farm.  She said she’s a little surprised at the disconnect between rural and urban folks, but not entirely surprised.  She said a lot of people grew up with agriculture in the family, but those numbers are falling.

“It’s surprising how much some of the people know about agriculture,” she said, “and it’s surprising how little others may know about Ag.  Most people really seem to want the information about where their food comes from”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minnesotan wins National Ag in the Classroom award

Juanita Reed-Boniface, a long-time Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom (MAITC) volunteer has won the prestigious 2015 National Agriculture in the Classroom (NAITC) Ag Advocate Award. Initiated in 2010 by NAITC; the award recognizes an exemplary volunteer who freely gives his or her time to promote agricultural literacy for students in PreK-12th grade. The National Grange is the annual sponsor.

Upon learning of her winning nomination, Reed-Boniface said, “I’ve advocated for agriculture and learning all my life. In recent years it has become my passion as I’ve recognized the importance of educating our youth about the food and fiber system. Receiving this award is a great honor and very humbling. I am sure there were others as deserving.” Juanita joins past winners from North Dakota, Utah, Oklahoma, Nevada and Maryland. She will be recognized at the opening dinner at the 2015 National Agriculture in the Classroom Conference to be held June 17-19 in Louisville, Kentucky.

Juanita Reed-Boniface has been educating children about agriculture for a long time, and recently won a prestigious national award as an Advocate for Ag (photo from agbooksforkids.com)

Juanita Reed-Boniface has been educating children about agriculture for a long time, and recently won a prestigious national award as an Advocate for Ag (photo from agbooksforkids.com)

Reed-Boniface, and her husband Dick, officially joined MAITC volunteers in 1995 when they attended a “Getting Comfortable in the Classroom” training workshop hosted by MAITC. Since then, she has made countless school visits educating youth about agriculture, and has also advocated agriculture through the Minnesota Farm Bureau, Minnesota and National CattleWomen, Minnesota State Fair, University of Minnesota 4-H, and Minnesota and National Agri-Women. Known as a “master teacher,” she takes pride in serving as a mentor to many educators, including sharing lesson plans and teaching methods.

“I remember those mid-1990’s training workshops well” said MAITC Program Director Al Withers. “You could always count on Juanita and Dick to be there, and to always be prepared and enthusiastic about helping students learn, whatever the setting. She is a premiere advocate for MAITC and our mission.”

Reed-Boniface grew up on a ranch in the Sandhills of Nebraska, graduated from the University of Nebraska and relocated to Minnesota in 1963 to begin a 30 year career as a 4-H educator with the Minnesota Extension Service. Reed-Boniface has received awards and recognition for her leadership in professional and community organizations.

The MAITC vision is for agriculture to be valued by all. The program’s mission is to increase agricultural literacy through K-12 education. Visitwww.mda.state.mn.us/maitc for more information.

 

The Rochester Beacon Academy is aiming for the fall of 2015

Beacon Final Cut from Chad Smith on Vimeo.

The Rochester Beacon Academy of Rochester, Minnesota, is aiming for a fall, 2015 start. The Academy is a charter school, which means it falls in the public school category. However, the curriculum will be a little different from the norm.

The school will feature things like smaller classroom sizes, more structure in the daily schedule, smaller numbers of students in the hallways in between classes for easier transitions, and more individualized attention for each student. According to pathfindersforautism.org, this may be the perfect setting for children diagnosed under the autism spectrum. These children require much more structure in the learning environment, with a lot of routine in how material is presented. They also like small class sizes, require help with social skills, and need lots of individual attention. All of these requirements are part of the intended curriculum at the Academy.

According to webmd.com, no child under the autism spectrum will learn the same ways as others will. In fact, the Academy will offer different options for students, such as those who need to be up and moving will be allowed to do things like squeezing stress balls, just to get some of their “wiggles out.”

While the Rochester Beacon Academy may be a good fit for students under the autism spectrum, anyone who wants to attend the Academy may do so. No diagnosis of any kind is required to attend the school.

Minnesota Children’s Museum offers little ones the Inventors Workshop

The Inventors Workshop from Chad Smith on Vimeo.

The Minnesota Children’s Museum of Rochester, Minnesota, believes that children can learn to love learning at an early age. The Museum offers a program called the “Inventors Workshop.” It’s targeted at kids in their preschool years, which experts say are key years at getting kids started on a path toward successful learning.

The Museum sets up supplies in it’s art room, and children are let loose to create what they will. There’s no limit except how far a child’s imagination can take them. They are free to create whatever they like, using the scissors, pencils, crayons, colored paper, and other raw materials.

It may look like the children are just playing with things, but the parents.com website says it may look like fun and games, but there’s an intense amount of brainwork going on. Young children learn through play and creative activity, so as they assemble the raw materials into creations, they’re learning things like problem solving and physics.

The babycenter.com website calls play “the business of childhood.” Play allows the child free rein to experiment with the world around him, and the emotional world inside of him. While it looks like child’s play, there’s a lot of work going on behind the scenes, including problem solving, skill building, and overcoming physical and mental challenges.

The Museum collects donated cardboard boxes, bottles, food containers, and different types of supplies throughout the year, and then reuse them for the art program. The Museum staff hopes visitors draw inspiration from the different exhibits and things going on around them, and will create something unique.

Fighting for the little guy on the family farm

 

“Nothing gets done without politics.”  Not exactly what you’d expect to hear from a 4th generation farmer, but it’s a philosophy that Minnesota Farmers Union President Doug Peterson has lived by his entire life.  He’s using that philosophy on a relentless campaign to improve the lives of farmers in Minnesota, and across the country.

 

Doug Peterson at a recent FarmFest near Redwood Falls, promoting agriculture at the Farmers Union booth (photo by: Mn Farmers Union)

Doug Peterson at a recent FarmFest near Redwood Falls, promoting agriculture at the Farmers Union booth (photo by: Mn Farmers Union)

Growing up on the farm:

Doug grew up on his father’s 300-acre farm south of Madison, Minnesota.  After his birth in 1948, he attended a one-room schoolhouse.  He spent a lot of his early childhood years at Farmers Union county meetings, where his father was the county President.  Some of his earliest memories at those meetings include “sitting in mom’s lap and riding on dad’s shoulders.”

 

A family of his own:

Doug is married to Elly Peterson, his high school sweetheart, who he began dating in ninth grade.  They have two sons, Aaron, who’s a lobbyist, and Ryan, a virologist who conducts stem cell research at Cornell University.

After graduating from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where he played college football for four years, the family settled in to life at Glencoe, Minnesota, where Doug worked as an art teacher and football coach for ten years.

 

Back to the Farm:

Doug returned to the family’s 300-acre farm soon after his father passed away from cancer in 1978.  He planted his first crops on the farm in 1981, and farmed actively until 2000.  He also worked full time as a teacher in the Canby and Montevideo school districts. It was during this stretch that he began his foray into politics.

 

Off to the state Capitol:

Doug was elected to the Minnesota State Legislature in 1990.  It was there that he gained “very valuable legislative experience,” according to Minnesota Farmers Union Vice President Gary Wertish.  Doug accomplished a lot during his time in state government.  One of his biggest accomplishments was authoring a bill mandating the use of 10 percent ethanol in every gallon of gas dispensed in Minnesota, a law that is still in effect today.

 

The Farmers Union comes calling:               Farmers Union Logo                        

After serving in the Minnesota Legislature for 12 years, Doug was elected President of the Minnesota Farmers Union, a job he’s held since then.   Doug describes Farmers Union’s main purposes as Legislative and Educational.

 

His knowledge of how to play the political game is very valuable, as Farmers Union spends a lot of time at the Minnesota State Capitol, as well as Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., advocating for policies that aid farmers in doing their jobs as efficiently as possible.  Farmers Union Vice President Wertish said Doug’s political experience and personal connections have proven invaluable as they make the rounds in state and national government offices.

 

Doug Peterson speaking with a reporter during a Farmers Union Fly-In campaign to Washington, D.C. (Photo by Mn Farmers Union)

Doug Peterson speaking with a reporter during a Farmers Union Fly-In campaign to promote agriculture in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Mn Farmers Union)

 

 They’re having some success at the process.  According to the North Carolina College of Ag and Life Sciences website, farmers, as a mere 2 percent of the population, produce food so efficiently that they feed the nation, and still export close to 100 billion dollars worth of their products too.

Peterson said Farmers Union is on a mission to educate the non-farming public on just what it is farmers do to produce the food on their dining room table.  He said “98 percent of our population is getting further and further removed from having direct access to any kind of farm or farming practices.”  That results in a lot of misconceptions about farming.

Clearing up the confusion on farming:

He said the biggest misconception the non-farm public has, is just how much money it takes to farm.

“If it cost you 400 dollars an acre to plant a crop, and you farm 1,000 acres, you’re looking at 400,000 dollars to plant a crop in a single year.  Most people I know don’t have that kind of money sitting in the bank somewhere as liquid assets.”

File photo of a family farmer at work (photo by Mn Farmers Union)

File photo of a family farmer at work (photo by Mn Farmers Union)

Government farm safety net payments have long raised the ire of non-farmers when it comes to agricultural practices, and Peterson said, “show me other major public investments that don’t have some kind of subsidy.  Things like roads, bridges, airlines, schools, and hospitals always have some kind of governmental help.  New businesses rarely build a new road to their place on their own.”

Farming has changed a great deal in the last few decades.  Most of the off-farm public have no idea that computers are now driving tractors.  The Farm Bill now creates roughly 16 million jobs around the country.  The average dollar spent in the farm sector turns over in the economy 7 times, according to Peterson.  In other sectors of the economy, the dollar turns over a mere two times.

 

Agriculture brings a lot to the table in the nation’s economy.  Peterson said they can’t ever quit bringing that fact to the attention of state and national legislators, and just as importantly, to the American public as well.

 

Minnesota Farmers Union 2012 Year in review: