Minnesota FFA Convention wraps up

Minnesota FFA Convention

The Minnesota State FFA convention wrapped up this week with the election of new state leaders and a bunch of great memories.

The final session of the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention concluded with the election of the six-member state officer team. The newly elected team will serve more than 11,000 members in Minnesota for one year. They will also spend the next year representing Minnesota, agriculture and agricultural education at state and national levels.

The 2017-2018 Minnesota FFA State Officer Team

The state officer candidates were interviewed by a panel of FFA members, agricultural educators and representatives from partnering organizations earlier this week. Elected FFA members were:

President: Katie Benson, Staples Motley FFA Chapter

Vice President: Emily Pliscott, Kenyon-Wanamingo FFA Chapter

Secretary: Kylee Kohls, Litchfield FFA Chapter

Treasurer: Spencer Flood, Dassel-Cokato FFA Chapter

Reporter: Eleora DeMuth, Grand Rapids FFA Chapter

Sentinel: Maddie Weninger, Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted FFA Chapter

 

Career Development Events

During the final session, Career Development Events (CDE) winners were announced. The top chapters in the state will advance to the national competition in Indianapolis in October. CDEs are competitive activities for students to showcase their skills in their respective competition. CDE results will be sent out in early May.

Minnesota FFA Convention

National Chapter Award

The Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted FFA Chapter received top honors for the National Chapter Award, sponsored by the Minnesota FFA Foundation. FFA Chapters apply for this honor by highlighting chapter activities in the categories of student development, chapter development, and community development. Chapter applications are reviewed and scored by a series of judges based on innovating ideas and accomplished goals.

Session speakers

“We live in a world where people are desperate for hope,” said Wendy Bauman, State Secretary, from the Kerkhoven Murdock Sunburg FFA Chapter in her retiring address, Feed Hope “When it comes down to it, the only thing we are able to do is love one another. When we choose to love, we feed hope.”

Mr. Gian Paul Gonzalez, motivational speaker and founder of Hope + Future, shared his insight about living “All In” at the final session of the Minnesota FFA Convention.

“‘All in’ is personal. No one can go ‘All In’ for you; It’s a personal choice.” said Gonzalez.

“No matter what our dreams look like, our success is determined not when we dream, but in the moments when we decide to strive,” said Spencer Wolter, State President, from the Windom FFA Chapter in his retiring address, Gettin’ Chicks.

###

About Minnesota FFA

The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information. Follow the Minnesota FFA Convention on social media or watch the recorded general sessions at mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming.

Convention photos by Matt Addington Photography can be viewed at: https://mattaddington.smugmug.com/FFA/2017-State-Convention – Download password: @MNFFA

Here’s what the kickoff to the state convention looked like. Enjoy!

MN FFA Foundation to livestream video during convention

The Minnesota FFA Association is reaching a larger audience with the new feature of live stream, hosted by the Minnesota FFA Foundation, during the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention, April 23-25 at the University of Minnesota (UMN) St. Paul campus. Nearly 4,000 members will attend the three-day event to compete in career development events, attend sessions and workshops and receive awards for their FFA achievements.

FFA Foundation live streaming

The Minnesota FFA Foundation will be hosting a livestream of several events at the Minnesota FFA State Convention in St. Paul April 23-25, for those who want to see what’s happening or relive some of the good-old-days from their own time in FFA. (photo from mnffafoundation.org)

Live stream will be hosted on the Minnesota FFA Foundation site:

mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming and will begin 30 minutes before the start of each session. Recordings of the sessions will be available to view after the session has occurred.

Live stream will be available for these sessions:

  • Reflections/Talent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 — 5:30 p.m.

 

  • Session 1: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 8:30 a.m.

 

  • Session 2: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 1:45 p.m.

 

  • Awards: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 6:30 p.m.

 

  • Session 3: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 — 8:45 a.m.

 

  • Session 4: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 — 12 p.m.

 

Visit mnffa.org for more details about the 88th Minnesota FFA convention. Follow along on social media and watch the general sessions at mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming

 

About Minnesota FFA

The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information.

 

Minnesota FFA Convention April 23-25th

Next week, the University of Minnesota (UMN) St. Paul campus will be flooded with a sea of blue jackets, as nearly 4,000 student members gather for the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention, April 23-25.

Minnesota FFA

The blue jackets are about to descend on the University of Minnesota for the State FFA Convention April23-25 at the College of Food, Agricultural, and Natural Sciences on the St. Paul Campus. (photo from Rachel Marthaler Photography.)

During the convention, Minnesota FFA members compete in career development contests, attend sessions and workshops and receive awards for their FFA achievements. At this three-day event, high school FFA members also are introduced to the UMN community.

FFA is a national organization founded in 1928 that recognizes and supports the interests of food, fiber and natural resource industries and encompasses science, business and technology as it is applied to production agriculture. There are 30 different career development events (CDE) that students will compete in at the Minnesota FFA convention. The events include everything from forestry to agricultural sales. The FFA CDEs are just as diverse as the UMN’s College of Food,Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) majors.

At the convention, FFA members meet UMN students, faculty and professors who are helping with competitions, workshops and other convention activities.

“The first time I came to the University of Minnesota was with my FFA chapter for convention,”said Wendy Bauman, FFA member from Kerkhoven Murdock Sunburg (KMS) Chapter. “Now I’m a freshman in CFANS studying agricultural education. FFA is what introduced me to the University of Minnesota and is the reason why I chose this school and major.”

Many University of Minnesota CFANS students share a similar story. Many past Minnesota FFA members have found a home on the St. Paul campus. The partnership between CFANS and Minnesota FFA has strengthened both organizations as they work toward a similar mission of preparing future leaders for their careers.

“Minnesota FFA plays a key role in youth development and leadership across the state,” said CFANS Dean Brian Buhr. “We are fortunate to have a strong relationship that benefits our programs and departments.”

Visit mnffa.org for more details about the 88th Minnesota FFA convention. Follow along on social media or watch the general sessions mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming.

Wondering just what kind of impact Minnesota FFA can make on students?

###

About University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences

The University of Minnesota’s College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), is one of the world’s leading research, education and outreach institutions in the natural resources, food and agricultural sciences. Its faculty, staff and students are dedicated to the enhancement and preservation of the world’s food supplies and natural resources. CFANS provides students the opportunity to enter career fields with some of the best job outlooks in the country, including 13 undergraduate majors and over 25 minors ranging from agricultural education and marketing communications to conservation biology and forest and natural resource management, to health and nutrition, and the future of food and agriculture management with a focus in business and technology. As part of this launch, the University will offer enhanced scholarships to Minnesota students, add additional recruitment events in Greater Minnesota and expand outreach to high school counselors and career centers across Minnesota.

About Minnesota FFA

 The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information.

 

 

Tractor Safety Class brings back farm memories

I had some serious flashbacks to the teen years when I got an assignment to take some pictures at a Tractor Safety Class in Rushford the other day. Watching some wide-eyed 12-15-year-old kids drive a tractor through an obstacle course and have to hook up the hydraulics of a commercial mower to the back of a different tractor looked like fun and a challenge all at the same time.

As a middle-aged man, the first thing you’re tempted to do is compare what the equipment of today is like to what you grew up on years ago.  Of course, the biggest difference is electronics and buttons to push instead of hydraulic levers to yank every time you wanted to do something.

The other big difference is an enclosed cab versus an open air seat.  I remember a lot of 90-100 degree days where air conditioning would have been nice, but what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, right?

I also didn’t know that the hydraulic hoses are now color-coded to make it easier to hook up to a tractor, which is a nice change from the old days.

The kids that took the course had to sit in a classroom for a couple of days before they got to go outside on one of the most beautiful days of the year to take the practical tests.  Did you ever have to back up farm equipment before and the implements appeared to do the exact opposite of what you wanted it to?  You turn it the OPPOSITE way of the direction you wanted it to go?  How aggravating could that be when you first were learning the business?

Tractor Safety Class is a good thing.

The Bobcat skid steer loader was always my favorite equipment to operate, but it wasn’t always an easy gig when you’re first learning how to operate it! (photo from bobcatrental.ca)

One of the more embarrassing flashbacks was learning to drive a skid steer.  That was always my favorite thing to operate, but the first time I tried to load it up onto the trailer, I forgot you need to take it up backward.  You can imagine what came next, right?  It winds up on its backside, but all I needed to do was push the levers forward and it was back on all four wheels.  It’s probably not hard to believe that it took awhile for me to stop hearing about that one!

I didn’t know this course was federally mandated.  You obviously will need the certification to work on farms, but it’s also necessary to work on the big commercial-scale lawnmowers as well, so keep that in mind.

 

 

 

Olmsted county farmer takes Farm Bureau honors

Minnesota_Farm_Bureau_Logo_345x143Ben Storm’s involvement with the Minnesota Farm Bureau only goes back one year.

But it’s been a busy year for the Dover farmer, as Storm won the Minnesota Farm Bureau’s Achievement Award late last year at the state convention. The state award gave him the chance to travel to Florida to compete on a national stage at the American Farm Bureau national convention earlier this month.

A simple phone call from a friend got Storm interested in the Minnesota Farm Bureau.

“A friend of mine called me and told me about their leadership conference,” Storm said. “He thought it would be a good idea for me to go along. I went to the conference last year and that’s how I got involved.”

He added, “Now I’m on the Olmsted County Farm Bureau Board of Directors and I get involved as much as I can.”

Storm said Farm Bureau provides many opportunities to tell the story of Agriculture to people who don’t know where their food comes from.

“We do an event we call Fun with the Farmer,” Storm said, “and we go to elementary schools in the Rochester area and educate kids. Rochester is a larger town with not a lot of agriculture in those schools, so going there and educating the kids on what we do is a lot of fun.”

Storm adds, “Farm Bureau is the reason I get to do things like that. We also spent some time last year at the State Capitol talking with legislators about Ag. I’d never done something like that, and I thought it was a lot of fun.”

Storm said the reason for educating the public about agriculture is apparent when they go to area schools and see the disconnect between urban areas and the farm.

“The more I see it the less surprised I am by it,” Storm said. “You continually see that these kids have no idea what Ag is, because they’re 4 and 5 generations removed from the farm now.”

Storm said winning the Minnesota Farm Bureau Achievement award was quite an honor.

“The Achievement Award is for people whose primary income is from farming,” Storm explained. “There are 3 criteria: your farm operation and growth, the financials of your operation, and your leadership experience inside and outside of Farm Bureau.”

One winner is chosen from multiple nominees.

“You fill out an application,” Storm said, “and on the state level, they judge each of the applications and follow up with interviews. The interview questions are basically for clarification on things in the application they were curious about.”

After winning the state competition, it was on to Orlando, Florida, and the national Achievement Award competition at the American Farm Bureau Convention.

Olmsted county farmer gets national recognition

Olmsted county farmer Ben Storm, at left, winner of the Minnesota Farm Bureau Achievement Award, gets recognized by Derek Helms, American Farm Bureau Federation Young Farm And Rancher Committee member from Arkansas. (photo from Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation)

“There was a group of about 60 people from Minnesota that went down,” Storm said. “It was nice to have people there you knew, but it was a lot of fun to visit with new people.”

He enjoyed learning about different types of farm operations from across the country.

“We spoke with a gentleman from Florida who raises alligators, snakes, and rats,” Storm said. “It’s the kind of thing you wouldn’t think of. You understand alligators and snakes, but I never got to ask him why he raises rats.”

He said farmers who raise different commodities do have common concerns.

“One of the biggest ones right now is lower commodity prices,” Storm said, “and what they’re doing to everybody’s operations. Plus, people are trying to get rents adjusted, because that’s a big cost.”

He adds, “Even the price of inputs is a big concern, and how they need to adjust too.”

Ben runs the family operation in the Dover area.

“Dad (Jacob) is partially retired,” said Storm, “but he still helps out when needed. I farm a little over 1,000 acres, and it’s a 50/50 rotation of corn and soybeans”

He adds,” We have a few sows, and we farrow show pigs and sell them to 4H and FFA kids. That’s more of a project Dad handles.”

 

 

 

Why FFA and agriculture are the Best Things Ever

By: Talisa Smith

A recent article by PETA described FFA as “lame AF.” Now, I see more and more posts from people who used to be in FFA agreeing with PETA. You folks that changed your mind, I’m betting you only did it because other people did. That means you are not, and never were, a proud FFA member.

Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Talisa Smith. I’m 16 years old, and from Fort Pierre, South Dakota. Right now I’m a sophomore at Stanley County High School. I have been a FFA member for three years now, and I can say I would never go back in time and change my mind about becoming one

I am my chapter’s reporter and am stationed by the flag when we hold meetings. Much as the flag covers the United States of America, I strive to inform every man, woman and child I can that FFA is a national organization. It reaches from the state of Alaska to Puerto Rico, and Maine to Hawaii. I am there to let everyone know what goes on in the chapter. So I’m going to tell you what FFA is to me and what my side of the story is.

Many people have read this article about how we are a lame organization. One thing that most people probably don’t realize is that those pictures they have are entirely out of context. What they said is wrong and they clearly don’t know what they are talking about.

In one point that they made, it states FFA teaches kids to raise animals and send them to the slaughterhouse to have them cut apart while they are still living. Well yes, these animals do die so that people don’t starve. However, the methods that they say they use to put the animals down are wrong.

In a slaughterhouse the animals are put down with a stun gun to the head because it’s painless to the animal and quick. The other way is they are put down is by a gas. To make sure that they are dead, workers will drain the rest of the blood so the animals don’t suffer. Then they are butchered for the meat so that the world can have food.

They had also mentioned that sheep tails are cut off and ears are pierced without using painkillers. Cutting the tails off is a process is called docking and it is for the sheep’s benefit. If we don’t do this, the tails would end up getting dirty and infection is a good possibility. We dock the tails so the sheep can stay healthy and not get sick. They don’t feel anything but a little pinch when they do this.  When we pierce their ears, it’s basically a small hole, just as cows get tags in their ear to tell them apart.

The next allegation is we steal calves away from their mothers. We bottle feed those calves instead of giving them milk from the cow. The milk we get from the cows is not just used for drinking. That is used for all sorts of thing like, cottage cheese, cheese, and ice cream. So if we take away that milk, you are going to take away ice cream. Do that, and you have to tell your kids that you are the reason that they can’t have any more ice cream. Now, to me, that just doesn’t sound right.

FFA and agriculture

Stanley County FFA chapter members volunteer to clean up local emergency vehicles as part of summer camp activities. (Contributed photo)

Another point in the article says that the skills needed to stand up and talk in front of a group are lame, uncool, and have no purpose in the world anymore. The article says people should just stick to their phones. What happens when you want a job and you can’t talk to someone in person? You can’t talk only through texting. I can tell you this: you will not get hired and you will not find a job if you can’t have a decent face-to-face conversation.

The article said it’s cooler to judge people instead of knowing different kinds of livestock and other animals. Well you are now saying that it is ok to belittle people and lower their self-confidence. FFA is trying to stop that in the first place.

FFA and agriculture

Talisa Smith of the Stanley County FFA chapter poses with the Peterson brothers, farmers who are nationally known Ag advocates. They made an appearance at a recent South Dakota State FFA convention. (contributed photo)

They had stated that it is better to be a follower than it is be different and stand up to be a leader. You are going to tell people that it’s better to act and follow someone than to stand up and be yourself? I am proud of who I am and I’m not afraid to stand up and be a leader that may change the world for the better.

Many FFA members take care of animals and know how to feed them and give them the right medicine so they don’t get sick. We want our animals to be the healthiest they can be. We take pride in this because we are feeding the world while doing something that we love to do. Some people are saying that’s dumb. You shouldn’t do that. Instead, be more like PETA and just talk about caring for animals, and not actually doing it. Well if nobody raises livestock, then what happens? We have no food if farmers just stop working. Great: We got everyone to stop like you wanted, but guess what? We have no food for anyone. Now what do you want us to do? We’ll see FFA members and the farmers they might grow up to be as where you’ll get your food from, so we need them.  Did you know that 1 farmer feeds at least 100 people, if not more?

 

FFA and agriculture

National FFA officers often take over local classes to teach life skills all FFA members can use. (contributed photo)

FFA doesn’t just teach you about agriculture. It teaches you life skills that you can use everywhere. You will meet great people along the way that you never would have met in the first place. There are 692,327 members right now, and 7757 chapters in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Those numbers are growing each year and I am so glad for that. Our mission is FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. And our motto is Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve. As an FFA member I am proud to live by this with everything I’m doing. I don’t think that most people realize is that agriculture is everywhere and is in almost all the jobs that we have.

So the next time someone wants to say that FFA is lame AF and belittle FFA and agriculture, make sure you do some research on it so you know what you’re talking about. You are also offending everyone involved because you information is wrong and hurtful.

 

 

Minnesota will host national FFA officers in January

Minnesota FFA chapters will host the national FFA officers  Jan. 7-13.  They will travel over 1,000 miles across the state to meet hundreds of FFA members and supporters.

The national FFA Leadership Team will make several stops in Minnesota this January as a part of State Experience Week.

The national FFA Leadership Team will make several stops in Minnesota this January as a part of State Experience Week.

Each year, only one state is selected to serve as the training ground for the national FFA officers. During their training, the six national officers will perfect keynote addresses and workshops before using them during their travels as national officers.

The national officers will visit the following locations:

Thursday, Jan. 7 Eden Valley-Watkins, Melrose

Friday, Jan. 8 Perham, Staples-Motley, Upsala

Saturday, Jan. 9 Upsala

Sunday, Jan. 10 Kerkhoven-Murdock-Sunburg

Monday, Jan. 11 Sleepy Eye, Fairmont, Randolph

Tuesday, Jan. 12 Rockford, Dassel-Cokato, University of Minnesota

Wednesday, Jan. 13 Academy for Sciences & Agriculture

Minnesota FFA

The Sleepy Eye FFA chapter, pictured here in January of 2015, will be one of the hosts to the National FFA leadership team on Monday, January 11th, as a part of State Experience Week. (photo from sleepyeyeonline.com)

Each national officer will deliver their keynote address based on their own personal life experiences. The officers will also present workshops, which include the following topics:

Sarah Draper (Utah): Look Up and Look Out – Having gratitude and serving others.

Sydney Snider (Ohio): Destination Awesome – How can our strengths help others?

Nick Baker (Tennessee): Grit: Passion and Persistence help us accomplish our goals

Taylor McNeel (Arkansas): Live the Journey – Being present in our journey

Abbey Gretsch (Georgia): #Struggle is Real – Overcoming hardships

Abrah Meyer (Iowa): The Price is Right – Valuing others

 

The national officer team was elected at the annual National FFA Convention on Saturday, Oct. 31 in Louisville, Kentucky. Throughout their year of service, they will travel nearly 100,000 miles and influence thousands of FFA members and supporters.

Here’s the 2015-16 theme for this year’s state FFA chapters: Together we..  Anyone you know in here?

 

About the Minnesota FFA Association

FFA is a national organization developing students’ potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.  It has more than 600,000 members in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

The Minnesota FFA Association represents nearly 11,000 members and almost 200 high school chapters across the state.

Agricultural education engages students through hands-on learning in the classroom, work-based learning opportunities known as Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects and FFA activities.

 

You can learn more about the experiences of FFA members and supporters by visiting www.mnffa.org and www.ffa.org.