SE Minnesota harvest results strong despite challenges

Crop harvest results

Michael Cruse is the University of Minnesota Extension Educator in Houston and Fillmore County of southeast Minnesota, who said crop harvest results were very good in spite of big challenges. (photo from umn.edu)

People who work in agriculture are resilient by nature. They have to be. They risk so much personally in the midst of circumstances that are completely out of their immediate control. For example, you can’t control the weather. Next time a tornado is threatening to wipe our your livelihood, try to turn it off. Let me know how that works out.

Folks off-the-farm have no idea just how much money a farmer has to borrow every year just for the sake of running his or her operation. The amount of money would shock most people. The crop isn’t even in the ground at the point.

Swarms of pests, either above or below ground, can wipe out a whole season’s worth of work. Violent windstorms were very hard on the wheat stands in southeast Minnesota this year. Early season frost forced some farmers to replant their crops earlier this spring. Rain just kept coming, usually at the worst times. Farmers typically wait for the forecast to show several dry days before they knock down alfalfa. However, the rainfall didn’t always follow the predictions accurately. Alfalfa got rained on, sometimes a whole lot.

However, southeast Minnesota farmers pulled in a very good crop again this season after all was said and done. While results are never 100 percent across the board, corn, soybeans, and alfalfa yields were excellent.

I spoke with Michael Cruse, the University of Minnesota Extension Service Educator in Houston and Fillmore counties, about harvest in the area. While the final numbers are not in yet, all indications are that things went extremely well. Give a listen here on chadsmithmedia.com:

 

Is the United States up for sale?

Why is the United States up for sale?

Foreign companies are quietly buying up farmland is the desert southwest to grow crops to send back to their own countries. Is this good for America? Are the United States really up for sale?

We have an awful lot of valuable natural resources in the United States, but there are two I’d like to draw your attention to specifically: Land and water. One we as human beings absolutely cannot live without, and one they aren’t making any more of. I’ll let you puzzle out which is which.

The reason I’m bringing this up is disconcerting to me. I’ve come across many articles online that report farmland in some of our most drought-stricken areas is being very quietly snapped up by foreign countries like Saudi Arabia. I bet you haven’t heard much about that in the national “news media,” have you?

Before you tell me, “You can’t believe everything you read online,” let me point out something: I know that. But let me teach you a little bit of journalism 101. If there’s enough smoke surrounding a story, there’s a fire in there somewhere. You just have to take the time to find it.

The way these companies’ are going about buying the land makes me fearful about the cost of our own natural resources, and let me explain why.

Have you heard of a business in Saudi Arabia called the Almarai Company? According to Reuters, in January of this year, they quietly purchased almost $32 million worth of land in California, a state that is suffering through years of drought. This is relevant because Almarai is the largest diary company in Saudi, and they want to grow alfalfa, one of the thirstiest crops in all of modern agriculture.

That is not good news for a state in it’s fourth year of drought so severe that residents and businesses who actually live and work in the state have to curtail water usage. And did I mention, estimates are the drought cost the state’s economy $2.74 billion dollars? Oh, and farmers had to literally plow under well over a half million acres of land because of dryness and the difficulty of getting enough water to irrigate the land.

The foreign land grab doesn’t just stop in California, either.

Just outside of Phoenix, Arizona, there’s a large farm that Almarai also bought for the purpose of growing hay and sending it back home. National Public Radio said the farm is roughly 15 square miles wide. That’s an acre total in the thousands, all to grow hay to send back to their country’s dairy cattle. So, why the rush to buy our land and use our water, you ask?

NPR reports the thing you may not know is Saudi Arabia used to grow it’s own alfalfa. But they ran into a problem. They used to sit on top of a huge natural aquifer, but due to poor management, it dried up. Ancient spring you may have read about in the Bible dried up. Only 50 years ago, the aquifer still contained enough water to fill Lake Erie.

As a result of mismanagement and greed, Saudi Arabia has drained it’s water supplies, and how they’re quietly buying up farmland in the southwest, right on the Arizona/California border. Tell me why this is a good thing?

Oh, and before you ask about laws regulating water usage, they only apply to local and domestic operations. Plus, it’s rather convenient that many of the areas being bought up don’t have water usage regulations in place yet? Is that a coincidence? If I’m looking for a place to grow alfalfa, which needs a lot of water to grow, I’m looking for places where I don’t have to worry about it. Wouldn’t you do the same?

So, how is this possible? In a word: Greed. And you can’t mention the word greed without talking about Washington, D.C., can you?

Our “leadership” passed an omnibus-spending bill last year. Yournewswire.com quoted Rand Paul as saying it was thousands of pages, “which no one read.” It’s too bad, because there was a little time bomb written into it that made foreign land grabbing even more possible.

Have you heard of the 1980 Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act (FIRPTA)? It required all foreign investors to pay taxes on what they acquired in the US. Guess what? Because of that little time bomb, that went away. That used to protect Americans (the people that live here?) from property taxes that went through the roof. It doesn’t do that anymore.

Now that the law is overthrown (not just by the President, either), foreign pension funds can now buy American real estate similar to what their United States counterparts can, and not face any financial repercussions.

So, what does the foreign takeover of these United States lands mean for the little folks like you and me?

I’ve just given you a blueprint on how to takeover a country, and do it legally. You get to the people that make laws in a particular country, you pay them enough to bend the laws to your favor, and you start buying. Okay?

So, if you buy enough land, and water, eventually you start to control the country. And when that happens, we’re in big trouble. The evidence is out there. Our politicians are bought and paid for, and our country is BEING bought and paid for.

It’ll take time, but it’s coming. Call me a conspiracy theorist? Fine. Do the research yourself.

I can’t figure out why this stuff is happening right in front of Americans, but we CHOOSE not to see it? Is that the ostrich gene taking over? Stick your head in the sand, and hope it goes away? It’s not.

Officials from other countries have been quoted directly as saying, “We will use your own laws against you.” They’re doing a bang up job so far.

 

MUSLIM IMMIGRANT: “PRAISE ALLAH! WE’RE GOING TO BE THE MAJORITY SOON!” (VIDEO)

 

What do we do, America?

Annual MDA survey relies on farmers’ participation

Minnesota Department of Ag Logo The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) is encouraging farmers to take part in its annual pesticide and fertilizer use survey. The 2016 survey is directed at corn producers and hay growers. The data helps the MDA track the use of agricultural chemicals on Minnesota farms and provides guidance to educational and research programs.

The process should begin February 10 and be completed by February 28. Questions will focus on the 2015 growing season and how farmers use and apply pesticide applications on corn and hay grown in Minnesota. It also includes questions on best management practices when it comes to nitrogen and manure applied to corn. The annual survey is completely voluntary and no personal questions are asked of producers.

Minnesota farmers may be getting calls from multiple agencies and companies conducting a variety of surveys this time of year, but the information gathered from this one is critical for research purposes. It’s conducted for the MDA by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agriculture Statistics Service out of their regional offices in Missouri. The MDA has conducted this annual survey for the past decade.

If you have questions about the MDA’s annual survey, or if you wish to view results of previous surveys, visit the MDA website at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/chemicals/pestfertsurvey.aspx.

Producers can also call the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at 651-261-1993 between 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday – Friday.