Nitrogen Smart workshops are coming to your area

Nitrogen Smart, Corn field, Farming, Ag, Agriculture

University of Minnesota Extension personnel will be holding Nitrogen Smart workshops for farmers coming up in the month of December. Good reminder on the most efficient ways to use nitrogen in your fields. (photo from mncorn.org)

University of Minnesota Extension invites growers to attend one of several upcoming Nitrogen Smart workshops.

Nitrogen Smart focuses on fundamentals for maximizing economic return on nitrogen investments and minimizing nitrogen losses. Each workshop is tailored to fit that specific region of the state.

Nitrogen Smart, Corn fields, Ag, Ag education, Minnesota

Brad Carlson, UMN Extension

“The goal of these sessions is to help farmers gain a better understanding of how to manage nitrogen more effectively,” says Brad Carlson, University of Minnesota Extension educator and workshop presenter. “It’s an opportunity to talk through the data and research. Farmers can use that information to help reduce environmental impacts and reduce costs for the farmer.”

Nitrogen Smart is presented by University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Minnesota Corn Growers Association, and hosted by the Minnesota Agriculture Water Resource Center (MAWRC).

The workshops are free to attend. No pre-registration is required.

Nitrogen Smart workshops are scheduled for:

DECEMBER 12 | 1:00PM-4:00PM | SLAYTON
4-H Building, Murray County Fairgrounds, 3048 S. Broadway Ave., Slayton

DECEMBER 13 |1:00PM-4:00PM | MAYNARD
Maynard Event Center, 341 Cynthia Street, Maynard

DECEMBER 14 | 9:00AM-12:00PM | NEW ULM
Best Western, 2101 S. Broadway, New Ulm

DECEMBER 15 | 1:00PM-4:00PM | MORRIS
U of M West Central Research and Outreach Center – AgCountry Room, 46352 State Hwy. 329, Morris

DECEMBER 16 | 9:00 AM-12:00PM | MOORHEAD
Hjemkomst Center, 202 1st Ave. N, Moorhead

DECEMBER 19 | 1:00PM-4:00PM | HUTCHINSON
McLeod Co. Extension Office, 840 Century Ave SW, Hutchinson

DECEMBER 21 | 9:00AM-12:00PM | ST. CHARLES
St. Charles City Hall, 830 Whitewater Ave, St. Charles

DECEMBER 22 | 9:00AM-12:00PM | FARIBAULT
Rice Co. 4-H Building, 1900 Fairgrounds Dr., Faribault

The following Nitrogen Smart workshops are tailored specifically to irrigators:

JANUARY 3 | 1:00PM-4:00PM | GLENWOOD
Lakeside, 180 South Lakeshore Drive, Glenwood

JANUARY 4 | 9:00AM-12:00PM | STAPLES
Central Lakes College, 1800 Airport Rd., Staples

JANUARY 5 | 1:00PM-4:00PM | HASTINGS
Pleasant Hill Library, 1490 S Frontage Rd., Hastings

For more information on Nitrogen Smart visit z.umn.edu/nitrogensmart, or contact Brad Carlson at bcarlson@umn.edu or 507-389-6745.

For additional information on nutrient management from University of Minnesota Extension click here.

To view nitrogen-related research funded by Minnesota’s corn farmers click here.

MDA weed of the month: Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard is the MDA weed of the month

Garlic Mustard is a highly invasive, noxious weed that is prevalent in southern Minnesota and rapidly making it’s way north. (Photo from MN Department of Ag)

January’s Weed of the Month is garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata).

Garlic mustard is an edible, biennial herb that emits a strong garlic odor. It was brought to the United States from Europe as a culinary herb. It has naturalized in many eastern and midwestern states.

In Minnesota, it is widespread in the south and is spreading north.  The bad news is garlic mustard is highly invasive. It grows in woodlands, and along trails and waterways. It outcompetes native plants, becoming detrimental to wildlife habitat and biological diversity.

Garlic mustard forms rosettes after seed germination in early spring. In its second year, it forms upright stems that produce flowers in May and June. Seeds begin to develop in slender pods shortly after flowering and are the plants’ primary means of spread.

The plant has distinctive characteristics to distinguish it from other woodland MDA-logoplants. In the rosette stage, the leaves are heart-shaped with toothed margins. When it matures, the leaves along the stem are triangular and the small, white, four-petaled flowers are produced in clusters at the tops of the stems. The plant produces slender seed capsules. Seeds can be spread by water and soil movement on boots and equipment.

Garlic mustard is a restricted noxious weed and cannot be transported, sold, or intentionally propagated in Minnesota. It is recommended that this species be prevented from spreading to new areas and that smaller populations be eradicated.

Managing garlic mustard takes persistence and a focus on preventing flowering, making timing a key component to management.

  • Regular site monitoring for several years will be required to ensure that new seedlings are destroyed and the seedbank is depleted.
  • Hand pulling may be practical for small infestations. Pull plants prior to flowering to prevent seed production. Flowering plants can continue to set seed following removal of soil.
  • Mowing of bolted plants prior to flowering can prevent seed production. All equipment should be inspected and cleaned prior to moving into new areas.
  • Foliar herbicide applications may be effective. If using herbicide treatments, check with your local University of Minnesota Extension agent, co-op, or certified landscape care expert for assistance and recommendations.

MDA reminds Minnesotans to use pesticides and fertilizers with care

With the arrival of spring, Minnesotans may be thinking about lawns, trees and gardens. Whether you are doing it yourself or hiring a professional, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) urges the safe use of pesticides and MDA-logofertilizers by following all label directions.

In other words, “the label is the law.” Pesticide and fertilizer labels specify how to use products safely and effectively. In Minnesota, it is unlawful to apply products without following label instructions.

If you hire a professional lawn care provider, do your homework. State law requires applicators to be licensed by the MDA in order to commercially apply weed and feed products, plant nutrient fertilizers, or pesticides to control weeds, insects or fungi. To be licensed by the MDA, applicators must possess knowledge and demonstrate qualifications to safely perform lawn, tree and garden services.

Follow these tips for a safe spring gardening season:

  • Licensed professionals must carry a valid ID card, so ask to see it before they start work;
  • Be wary of people who claim their products are completely safe, or pressure you to sign a service contract;
  • Recognize posted warning flags in areas that have been chemically treated;
  • Review written records provided by applicators to document their work, including products used and amounts applied;
  • If you do it yourself, do not apply products in windy or adverse weather conditions. High wind can cause products to drift and potentially harm people or plants;
  • Sweep sidewalks and hard surfaces of unused product and reapply to their intended site; and,
  • Buy only what you need and store unused product safely.

Consumers can call the Better Business Bureau at 800-646-6222 and check Lawn-Care-Alpharetta3customer satisfaction history about lawn care companies. For information about applicator licenses, call the MDA at 651-201-6615.  To report unlicensed applicators, please file a complaint on the MDA website (www.mda.state.mn.us) or call 651-201-6333.

 

Organic farm transition support returns for 2015 in Minnesota

Minnesota farmers can apply for Organic Transition Cost Share funding again in 2015. The three-year-old program refunds a portion of the cost of working with an organic certifying agency. The refund can span some or all of the 36 months a transition typically takes.

“Farmers are not required to hire a certifier. However, if they want their crops MDA-logoand/or livestock certified, working with a certifier during the transition allows them to practice record keeping and on-farm inspections, so they’ll be ready when it really counts,” said Minnesota Department of Agriculture Organic Program Administrator, Meg Moynihan.

Only farmers who are new to organic may apply. The program reimburses 75 percent of the cost to hire a certifier during transition and requires an on-farm mock inspection. Applicants may also include the cost of soil testing and attending an approved organic conference in Minnesota or a neighboring state. Payments are capped at $750 per year. For costs paid during calendar year 2015, applications must be postmarked no later than February 14, 2016.

Moynihan added, “Demand for organic crops and dairy is currently outstripping supply, and organic price premiums are strong right now. This means there’s room in the market for farmers to transition and join almost 700 certified organic farms in Minnesota.”

Organic Farming

Transitioning from conventional to organic farming is expensive, but there is help available for Minnesota farmers who want to make the switch (Photo from forbes.com)

Organic Transition Cost Share Program application forms, a set of Frequently Asked Questions, and a list of approved certifying agencies offering transition verification are available at www.mda.state.mn.us/organic or by calling 651-201-6012.