Minnesota/Wisconsin Tax Reciprocity Could Return

Minnesota residents who commute across the border into Wisconsin for work could soon save money on their income tax returns. The 2017 tax bill, which passed the legislature last week and was signed into law by Gov. Mark Dayton on May 30, included a provision authorizing a new income tax reciprocity agreement between Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Income tax reciprocity Minnesota Wisconsin

Minnesotans who travel to Wisconsin for work got some good news as part of the 2017 tax package signed by Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton contains a new reciprocity agreement between Minnesota and Wisconsin. (photo from the St Paul Pioneer Press)

The income tax reciprocity provision calls for a dual track approach: for tax year 2017, Minnesota residents working in Wisconsin will be eligible for an income tax reciprocity tax credit. Additionally, the bill instructs the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Revenue to work with the secretary of the Wisconsin Revenue Department to enter into a new income tax reciprocity agreement for tax year 2018. If the two states are unable to reach an agreement, the tax credit will continue for Minnesota residents.

“Income tax reciprocity is a huge issue for our area,” said Sen. Jeremy Miller (R-Winona), who authored an income tax reciprocity bill early in session. “Thousands of people live in Minnesota but commute to Wisconsin for work – in fact, Houston County is the number one county in Minnesota impacted by the lack of a reciprocity agreement. I have spent years working with Rep. Davids and others toward a bipartisan solution to make filing tax returns more convenient for these residents. I’m very happy we were finally able to get this signed into law.”

The tax bill stipulates that a reciprocity agreement must include the following:

 

  • A provision providing for suspending the agreement if either party does not pay on time
  • A provision setting the interest rate that will be applied
  • A provision stating a time for annual reconciliation
  • A provision requiring both parties to conduct joint benchmark studies about the agreement every five years
  • A provision providing for an annual application for taxpayers who request an exemption
  • A provision stating the quarterly payments must be a reasonable estimate of loss

“This was one of the most productive legislative sessions we have had in a long time,” continued Sen. Miller. “In addition to tax reciprocity, the tax relief package included targeted relief to middle income families, senior citizens, small businesses, and farmers, as well as a first-in-the-nation student loan tax credit, which I authored in the Senate. Finally, this bill included additional permanent, ongoing local aid for cities and counties. I’m proud of the things we were able to get done for the people of Minnesota.”

There was an income tax reciprocity agreement in place from 1968 to 2009, but it was terminated because Wisconsin was not making timely reimbursement payments. An income tax reciprocity tax credit was included in the bipartisan tax bill that passed at the end of the 2016 before ultimately being vetoed by the governor.

Minnesota FFA Convention wraps up

Minnesota FFA Convention

The Minnesota State FFA convention wrapped up this week with the election of new state leaders and a bunch of great memories.

The final session of the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention concluded with the election of the six-member state officer team. The newly elected team will serve more than 11,000 members in Minnesota for one year. They will also spend the next year representing Minnesota, agriculture and agricultural education at state and national levels.

The 2017-2018 Minnesota FFA State Officer Team

The state officer candidates were interviewed by a panel of FFA members, agricultural educators and representatives from partnering organizations earlier this week. Elected FFA members were:

President: Katie Benson, Staples Motley FFA Chapter

Vice President: Emily Pliscott, Kenyon-Wanamingo FFA Chapter

Secretary: Kylee Kohls, Litchfield FFA Chapter

Treasurer: Spencer Flood, Dassel-Cokato FFA Chapter

Reporter: Eleora DeMuth, Grand Rapids FFA Chapter

Sentinel: Maddie Weninger, Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted FFA Chapter

 

Career Development Events

During the final session, Career Development Events (CDE) winners were announced. The top chapters in the state will advance to the national competition in Indianapolis in October. CDEs are competitive activities for students to showcase their skills in their respective competition. CDE results will be sent out in early May.

Minnesota FFA Convention

National Chapter Award

The Howard Lake-Waverly-Winsted FFA Chapter received top honors for the National Chapter Award, sponsored by the Minnesota FFA Foundation. FFA Chapters apply for this honor by highlighting chapter activities in the categories of student development, chapter development, and community development. Chapter applications are reviewed and scored by a series of judges based on innovating ideas and accomplished goals.

Session speakers

“We live in a world where people are desperate for hope,” said Wendy Bauman, State Secretary, from the Kerkhoven Murdock Sunburg FFA Chapter in her retiring address, Feed Hope “When it comes down to it, the only thing we are able to do is love one another. When we choose to love, we feed hope.”

Mr. Gian Paul Gonzalez, motivational speaker and founder of Hope + Future, shared his insight about living “All In” at the final session of the Minnesota FFA Convention.

“‘All in’ is personal. No one can go ‘All In’ for you; It’s a personal choice.” said Gonzalez.

“No matter what our dreams look like, our success is determined not when we dream, but in the moments when we decide to strive,” said Spencer Wolter, State President, from the Windom FFA Chapter in his retiring address, Gettin’ Chicks.

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About Minnesota FFA

The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information. Follow the Minnesota FFA Convention on social media or watch the recorded general sessions at mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming.

Convention photos by Matt Addington Photography can be viewed at: https://mattaddington.smugmug.com/FFA/2017-State-Convention – Download password: @MNFFA

Here’s what the kickoff to the state convention looked like. Enjoy!

MN FFA Foundation to livestream video during convention

The Minnesota FFA Association is reaching a larger audience with the new feature of live stream, hosted by the Minnesota FFA Foundation, during the 88th Minnesota FFA Convention, April 23-25 at the University of Minnesota (UMN) St. Paul campus. Nearly 4,000 members will attend the three-day event to compete in career development events, attend sessions and workshops and receive awards for their FFA achievements.

FFA Foundation live streaming

The Minnesota FFA Foundation will be hosting a livestream of several events at the Minnesota FFA State Convention in St. Paul April 23-25, for those who want to see what’s happening or relive some of the good-old-days from their own time in FFA. (photo from mnffafoundation.org)

Live stream will be hosted on the Minnesota FFA Foundation site:

mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming and will begin 30 minutes before the start of each session. Recordings of the sessions will be available to view after the session has occurred.

Live stream will be available for these sessions:

  • Reflections/Talent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 — 5:30 p.m.

 

  • Session 1: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 8:30 a.m.

 

  • Session 2: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 1:45 p.m.

 

  • Awards: Monday, April 24, 2017 — 6:30 p.m.

 

  • Session 3: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 — 8:45 a.m.

 

  • Session 4: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 — 12 p.m.

 

Visit mnffa.org for more details about the 88th Minnesota FFA convention. Follow along on social media and watch the general sessions at mnffafoundation.org/livestreaming

 

About Minnesota FFA

The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. More than 25,000 students in Minnesota are enrolled in agricultural education classes. Students who have taken three or more classes in career and technical education, including agricultural education have a graduation rate of 98.7 percent. Visit www.mnffa.org for more information.

 

MN Farmers Have Until May 5 to Renew CSP Contracts

Land Stewardship Project, CSP, Conservation stewardship programMinnesota farmers have until May 5 to re-enroll in the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP). This renewal option is specifically for farmers and ranchers who enrolled in CSP initially in 2013. Farmers are encouraged to contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office for more information on renewing (www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/contact/local).

CSP is a comprehensive working lands conservation program that provides technical and financial assistance to farmers and ranchers to actively manage and maintain existing conservation systems and to implement additional conservation activities on land in production. Through CSP, participants take steps to improve soil, water, air and habitat quality, and can also address energy conservation issues.

“CSP is a wonderful program,” said Jon Jovaag, a Land Stewardship Project farmer-member from Austin, Minn. Jovaag had a CSP contract in the past and plans on reapplying in 2017. “It helps farmers implement conservation practices over their entire farming operation.”

Land Stewardship Project, Conservation Stewardship Program, CSP

The Land Stewardship Project would like to remind Minnesota farmers that the renewal deadline for the Conservation Stewardship Program is May fifth. The renewal option is specifically for farmers that enrolled in CSP back in 2013. (photo from nrcs.usda.gov)

Program contracts, which are administered by the NRCS, last for five years, at which time they are eligible for renewal. There are approximately 7,000 U.S. farmers and ranchers with program contracts that will expire this year, totaling over 9.5 million acres. In Minnesota, there are 552 contracts expiring, totaling 387,331 acres.

It is optional to renew an expiring contract, and participants who do not re-enroll can always re-apply and compete for funding in future annual program signups. However, there is significant benefit to renewing now: the process for renewing is non-competitive and much simpler than re-applying through the competitive process later, and participants will avoid any gaps in their CSP payments that would otherwise occur.

NRCS has already mailed letters to all participants with contracts that are set to expire this year. Local NRCS offices will then follow up with producers to discuss renewal criteria and new conservation options. Participants will need to meet additional renewal criteria. Under the terms of the 2014 Farm Bill, program contract holders can renew their contracts provided they have met the terms of their initial contract, agree to adopt and continue to integrate conservation activities across the entire operation, and agree to either meet the stewardship threshold of at least two additional priority resource concerns or exceed the stewardship threshold of at least two existing priority resource concerns by the end of the renewed contract period.

Here’s a bit of a refresher course on the CSP if you’re thinking about doing it for the first time:

Meet the Oggun farm tractor

Oggun Farm Tractor

Southeast Minnesota residents got their first peek at the Oggun farm tractor at a viewing at Featherstone Farms of Rushford earlier this month. (Photo by Chad Smith)

It’s called the Oggun (Oh-goon), and it’s a different take on the farm tractor than many folks in agriculture may be used to. Southeast Minnesota residents got their first look at the new tractor during a showcase event at Featherstone Farms of Rushford on Wednesday, April 5.

 

The tractor was specifically designed for smaller farms, but that’s not what makes it unique. It’s unique in its design, it’s price, and the way it’s adaptable to newer technologies. The tractor has many unique characteristics, especially because it’s built with an open-source manufacturing design and parts you could find at a local tractor supply company. The idea for the tractor first began a short time ago.

The idea

Former IBM engineers and long-time business partners Horace Clemmons and Saul Berenthal (a Cuban-American) came together to form Alabama-based Cleber LLC. One day, Berenthal told Clemmons he wanted to do business back in his native country. The two talked over a lot of options, including software, but decided to go in a different direction.

“They started looking at things going on in the country,” said Locky Catron, a partner in Cleber, during opening remarks to the people in attendance, “and saw that the government had given land back to about 300,000 farmers, but there were only 60,000 tractors on the island.”

The tractors were all roughly 30 years old and of Russian design. Horace decided in June of 2015 that he and Saul were going to build tractors for Cuba. They needed to build something simple and easily fixed, because Cuban farmers were used to fixing everything themselves. They also needed to build something that was affordable. Mass production of tractors began in November of 2016.

The model

“That’s why they went to the open-source manufacturing model,” Catron said, “using all off-the-shelf parts. They designed the tractor based on the design of the Allis-Chalmers G. After doing all the work to put it together, the company realized business probably wasn’t going to happen in Cuba until the embargo is lifted.”

Once American farmers got wind of what Cleber was doing, they showed a lot of interest in the product as well. The business then set up shop in Paint Rock, Alabama, and began showing it to interested American farmers.

“I learned a valuable lesson from the Cuban farmers,” Clemmons said, “because they helped us understand how we can better serve farmers across the globe. $10,000 is still a lot of money to small farmers across the globe, so we have to create a business model where the price goes down every year.”

Cleber, LLC., told customers around the globe, including in Ethiopia, Peru, Chile, Brazil, and Australia, that they would give them the design of the tractor, which most companies don’t do. They agreed to ship parts that their customers couldn’t make in their countries with the idea that eventually the countries would take over the entire manufacturing process.

“We have offered a business proposition to our customers that says, ‘put me out of business,’” Clemmons said. “That’s about the only way we’re going to get 40-50 percent of the world’s smallest farmers equipped to do their work.”

People ask him how they expect to make money. His answer was a simple one.

“It’s called trust,” he said. “It’s called value-added. How hard would it be to use this technology and turn it into a skid steer? It’s got the engine, it’s got the hydraulics, so I’d take the tires off and put tracks on, and put a bucket on the front.”

He said they designed components to put together and they want to let people be creative in how they use those components.

The advantages

“Equipment (like tractors) is built using proprietary systems,” Catron said. “It’s unique components for a unique piece of equipment. We’re building the Oggun tractor that’s open-source, we’re building it using architectures, and we’re building it in the same way that technology is currently built today.”

Clemmons said the Oggun technology is simple, unique, practical, and it’s what small farmers need. Using off-the-shelf parts to build their tractors improves the local economies of their customers as well. The replacement parts can be found at local businesses like ag supply stores or auto parts stores.

“The parts don’t come painted certain colors, with patents on them, but instead they come out of the local economy,” Clemmons said. “All of that lowers the price over time because of the larger volume we get by using readily available components. Those components lower the price for everyone over time.”

Some of the specific tractor specs include a 19-horsepower Honda gas engine. The tractor length is just over 10 feet long and the weight is 1700 pounds. The brakes and the steering are hydraulic, with independent hydraulic drive. There’s also a unique zero-turn capability that comes with this tractor. It also has a 3-point hitch for implements. There’s also an optional PTO capability as well.

“It’s more than a tractor, the Oggun is a different way of thinking,” Clemmons added. More information is available at www.thinkoggun.com.

Yellowjackets baseball wants more consistency

It’s been more of an up-and-down season than Rochester Community and Technical College Yellowjackets baseball coach Steve Hucke would like. The team is 12-12 on the season, including a trip down south to play against some very good competition.

The early season strength of the Yellowjackets has been pitching. The batting order is still looking for a little more consistency, but Hucke said they’ve got the talent to hit the ball well. They’ve also been bitten by the injury bug.

Yellowjackets baseball

RCTC baseball coach Steve Hucke says he’s looking for more consistency from the Yellowjackets, who are 12-12 on the season going into their next action on Thursday, April 13, with a home doubleheader at 2 and 4:00. (article from wn.news.com)

“Our record says we’re .500 and that’s kind of how we’ve been playing,” Hucke said. “We’ll come out one day and play really tough and look really good. For some reason, we’ll come back and I don’t know if we’re satisfied with that or what. I’m happy with the wins but I’m not satisfied with being .500 because I think we’re a better team than that.”

The Yellowjackets baseball team had a  big question mark coming into the season, which was pitching. The team had to replace some good arms from last season but they’ve had some good kids step up and fill some of those roles. He says the unfortunate thing is the batters can’t seem to generate consistent run support.

 

 

“Our relief pitchers have come in and they understand their role that they’re supposed to fill when they enter the game,” Hucke said. “It’s been fun to see them come in and hold leads or get saves, and to pitch well enough for us to have a chance to come back and get a win.”

The first bullpen breakdown of the season didn’t happen until last Sunday when a normally reliable reliever came in, left a pitch up, and gave up three runs to Dakota County Technical College in the seventh inning. However, the Jackets did come back and win the game 4-3 in the bottom of the seventh inning on a walk-off base hit.

As he looks up and down the batting lineup, Hucke feels the team has a lot of potential to do some damage at the plate. The biggest challenge right now is the Yellowjackets baseball team is struggling with injuries.

 

 

“We’ve got the sticks to do it,” Hucke said, “we just need our approach at the plate to be a little more consistent and in tune with what we’re trying to do. We’re getting there.”

The team is getting much better defensively after what Hucke called a very rocky start to the season. He said the team likely has more errors to start a season than they’ve had in the last few years. A lot of it may have to do with spending most of their time inside the bubble over the football field working out to suddenly finding themselves outside in the middle of competition, switching from AstroTurf to natural grass.

“You get used to attacking the ball a little bit differently now that you’re on grass versus staying back and waiting for it to get to you on turf,” Hucke said. “We’re making some great plays in the outfield. Our outfielders have been phenomenal and we’re getting there around the infield so I think we’ll be okay.”

The team is coming off a Sunday afternoon split against Dakota County Technical College, dropping the first game 4-0 before coming back in dramatic fashion in the second game, winning 4-3. Hucke said the conference schedule is going to be as competitive as ever this spring.

“Our conference is pretty competitive and very talented,” he said. “We’ve also played one of our toughest non-conference schedules in recent years. We played a lot of tough teams on our spring trip to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, including a lot of Division 1 and Division 2 teams (scholarship programs). We came out of there at .500 against good teams so I can’t complain too much about that.”

Hucke said the trips down south give the team a chance to get to know each other. It’s important to find out who gets along with who and the team gets to find out about each other.

“Now, they’re forced to be together every day on a bus, in the condominiums where we stay, and out on the diamond,” Hucke said. “They’ll find out what the team is made of after a trip like that.”

The Yellowjackets baseball team is back in action on Thursday, April 13, with a home doubleheader against the St. Mary’s JV squad at 2 and 4:00. They’ll hit the road for a Friday conference doubleheader at St. Cloud Tech with games scheduled for 1 and 3:00.

 

Agriculture News at the Minnesota Legislature

Minnesota Legislature In my years of living and working in Minnesota, I’ve watched the state legislature as part of my roles in broadcasting and journalism, and it’s safe to say the polarization along political lines is as big a challenge as it’s ever been. But it’s good to see that agriculture can actually play a part in bringing the Minnesota Legislature to the table to get things done.

I offer as proof a conversation I had last week with Thom Peterson, the Director of Government Relations with the Minnesota Farmers Union. If something is happening that could potentially affect the state’s agriculture industry, he’s one of the people that’ll know about it before the public. The legislature recently passed an ag appropriations bill and Peterson said it’s a good example of how people at the capitol can still work together.

Property tax Minnesota Legislature

Thom Peterson is Director of Government Relations for the Minnesota Farmers Union

“The Ag Appropriations Bill for the House of Representatives passed last week 134-0,” he said, “which I think is kind of neat because, in this day and age when a lot of people are on opposite ends of the spectrum, a lot of times ag groups and legislators are still able to work together.”

The Chair of the Agriculture Finance Committee in the Minnesota Legislature is Republican Rod Hamilton from southwest Minnesota and Jeanne Poppe, a Freeborn County Democrat, is the DFL lead on the Ag Finance Committee. Peterson said she worked with Representative Hamilton to pass a good bill that both parties could agree on.

One of the interesting things about the Appropriations Bill is funding for more hemp production in the state. Peterson said production has grown in the last couple of years in different parts of the state. The law allowing production first passed in 2015, with seven farmers growing 35 acres of hemp for the first time in 50 years.

This year, he said more than 40 farmers are going to plant 2,000 acres of hemp in Minnesota. Folks may hear hemp and automatically associate it with marijuana. This is not the same thing as growing an illegal drug in a farm field. Hemp is potentially a very valuable product for the state’s farmers.

“I always say you’d have to smoke 40 acres of it to have a chance to get high,” Peterson said. “It has no THC value (the chemical that induces the “high”). Canada has been growing and selling it to us for years with no problems.”

Other things looming for agriculture is the potential for some property tax relief for farmers and gricultural landowners. Here’s the conversation I had last week with Thom:

 

Farmers Union applauds ditch mowing legislation signature

The Minnesota Farmers Union (MFU) today applauded the signature of Senate File 218 by Governor Mark Dayton that implements a moratorium on the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MNDOT) in enforcing permit requirements for mowing and baling in right of way on trunk highways, except for land that adjoins state land, until April 30th, 2018.

MFU had raised concerns with the new permit system MNDOT had announced in December of 2016. Many farmers saw it as unnecessary, confusing and burdensome.

mowing ditches moratorium

Farmers mowing and baling ditches will continue as is for the next year, thanks to legislation signed by Governor Dayton placing a moratorium on a MN-DOT plan to require permits to mow rights-of-ways next to roads.

“Mowing roadsides has been an important source of forage for farmers, controls weeds, and it improves visibility on highways” said MFU President Gary Wertish. “The legislation will give all parties a chance to get together and address issues and MFU encourages farmers to pay attention to this issue over the interim.

“Make sure to be involved in making your voices heard on this issue” added Wertish.

Under the legislation, MNDOT will recommend to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over transportation, agriculture, and natural resources, that there be an establishment of a permit or notification system to mow or hay in a trunk highway right-of-way. The recommendation must be developed with input from agriculture and environmental groups. The recommendation must contain at least the following elements:

(1) ease of permit application or notification;

(2) frequency of permits or notifications;

(3) priority given to the owner or occupant of private land adjacent to a trunk highway right-of-way;

(4) determination of authority to mow or hay in trunk highway right-of-way in which adjacent land is under the jurisdiction of the state or a political subdivision; and

(5) recognition of the differences in the abundance of wildlife habitat based on geographic distribution throughout the state.

MFU thanks Rep. Chris Swedzinski (R-Ghent) and Sen. Gary Dahms (R-Redwood Falls) for their work as chief authors of this legislation.

Minnesota Farmers Union—Standing for Agriculture, Fighting for Farmers (www.mfu.org).

‘Can You Hear Me?’ Scam Calls hit MN

can you hear me now phone scam

The ‘can you hear me now’ term isn’t just for cell phone commercials. It’s a part of the latest telephone scam hitting MN. If the first thing you hear is a question similar to this, hang up. (Photo from thebalance.com)

“Can you hear me?” “Are you there?” “Is this you?” Most people have been asked these questions in a phone call. News outlets and organizations across the country report that people are receiving calls from individuals who ask questions designed to get a “yes” answer.  But responding “yes” may leave people on the hook for more nuisance calls and maybe even unauthorized charges.  This new scheme is called the “Can You Hear Me?” Scam. “Chris” received a call while he was eating dinner. He answered the call, and a person asked, “Can you hear me?” Chris replied, “Yes.”  He then heard a recording that claimed he had won a free cruise. Chris realized the call may be part of a scam and hung up.

How the scam works

The details of this scam vary, but it always begins with a call, usually from a telephone number that appears to be local. When the person answers the call, the scam artist tries to get the person to say “yes”—most often by asking, “Can you hear me?” “Is this the lady of the house?” or a similar question. By responding “yes,” people notify robo-callers that their number is an active telephone number that can be sold to other telemarketers for a higher price. This then leads to more unwanted calls.

In some cases, the caller may record the person saying “yes.” Scam artists may be able to use a recorded “yes” to claim that the person authorized charges to his or her credit card or account. How can scammers access your account?  Some companies share their customers’ information with third-party companies or allow third parties to charge customers’ accounts (called “cramming”) in exchange for payment. Scam artists may also obtain financial information from data breaches or leaks or through identity theft.

Whether the “Can you hear me?” calls are simply nuisance calls or something more sinister, there are steps you can take to avoid falling victim to phone scams.

  • Check phone numbers closely. Scam artists spoof calls to make them appear to be from a local telephone number. Even if a number appears to be local, it is best to avoid calls from numbers with which you are not familiar.

 

  • Hang up. If you answer a call that seems suspicious, hang up. Remember, “Minnesota Nice” does not apply to scammers. It is not rude to hang up abruptly on a suspicious caller.

 

  • Carefully review your financial statements and telephone bills. Whether or not you have been targeted by a scam, it is a good idea to review your bills line-by-line for unauthorized or fraudulent activity. The law provides some protection for people to dispute unauthorized charges to their credit cards and bank accounts, but these laws generally impose time limits. It is important to check right away for charges you did not make or approve so you have time to file a dispute.

Reporting unwanted calls

If you receive a call that may be part of a “Can You Hear Me?” scam, you should report it to the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). The FTC has the authority to enforce federal laws regulating nuisance calls and interstate fraud over the telephone. Contact the Federal Trade Commission, Consumer Response Center, 877-382-4357 or www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov.

For more information, or to file a complaint, contact the Office of Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson, 445 Minnesota Street, Suite 1400, St. Paul, MN 55101, 651-296-3353 or 800-657-3787, TTY: 651-297-7206 or 800-366-4812

http://www.presspubs.com/quad/opinion/article_3c3888f2-196d-11e7-8b0e-4700503757c6.html

 

Here’s how you handle a phone scammer: If you state obvious falsehoods and they don’t call you on it, they’re scammers. Hang up the phone. Don’t worry about hurting people’s feelings. Yes, I realize it’s a bit of a spoof video, so I’d encourage you to just hang up if you didn’t initiate the phone call.

Vikings GM looks to future at NFL Combine

The annual meat market that is the NFL combine is underway in Indianapolis. The next generation of NFL stars will be poked, prodded, tested, and questioned as teams try to figure out who is draft worthy and who isn’t. Vikings General Manager Rick Spielman held a press conference on Wednesday in Indy and covered a wide range of topics. As you may imagine, Adrian Peterson was a hot topic, but Spielman also covered Sam Bradford, the recovering Teddy Bridgewater, and the NFL Draft.

You have to admire Spielman being forthright and dealing with the team’s free-fall from a 5-0 “we’re Super Bowl contenders” start to an 8-8 finish. Spielman and the rest of the Vikings brain trust got to work when the offseason began looking at where the Purple will go from here.

“I and especially Coach (Mike) Zimmer are never going to look for excuses on what happened,” Spielman said in opening remarks to the media. We ended up 8-8 and, from our standards, that’s not good enough for our organization.”

NFL Combine Vikings

Vikings General Manager Rick Spielman spoke to reporters at the NFL Combine this week in Indianapolis, covering a wide range of topics as he looked to next season and the future of the Vikings. (photo from Pioneer Press YouTube page)

They’ve spent the past three to four weeks meeting with scouts and coaches analyzing everything they do. They’ve gotten together as a group regarding their team, potential free agents, and on the draft.

“We have a pretty good sense of what we need to do to try to improve our ball club from where we were last year,” Spielman said, “and we’re looking forward to getting started.”

At that point, he opened it up to questions from the media in attendance. The first question was on Sam Bradford’s performance in his first year as Vikings quarterback. Spielman admitted at that point he lost a $1 bet that the first question would involve the team’s decision to decline the $18 million option on running back Adrian Peterson.

Here are some of the highlights from the presser this week in Indy.