Sheep and goats getting more popular on southeast MN farms

The sounds of sheep and goats on southeast Minnesota farms are becoming a little more common than most residents realize. The last couple of years have seen increasing interest in raising the smaller breeds of livestock for a variety of reasons.

sheep and goats

Sheep and goat numbers are picking up on farms across southeast Minnesota, due in part to the smaller size of the animal, especially when it comes to 4H competition.

As sheep interest continues growing in both Houston and Fillmore counties, the Extension Service will host a couple of sheep-related workshops this summer. A sheep producer workshop is set for Rushford on June 16th, with a sheep workshop for area 4H members on the 17th in Preston. Extension Educator Michael Cruse said many area residents might not know that sheep and goat numbers are on the rise.

“Sheep and goats are on the increase in Houston and Fillmore counties,” Cruse said, “especially for 4H projects. There are a number of reasons for this, but the primary reason is they’re smaller animals and easier to handle for 4H kids.”

He said the sheep producer meeting in Rushford is a unique opportunity for area livestock farmers. The University of Minnesota Extension Service recently hired a Sheep Specialist named Travis Hoffman, who the U of M is sharing with North Dakota. After talking with Hoffman over the winter, Cruse wanted to put together a couple of events to maximize his time if he made the trip to southeast Minnesota.

sheep and goats

Houston and Fillmore County Extension Agent Michael Cruse is putting on Extension programs for sheep farmers and 4H kids that want to exhibit sheep and goats at local competitions. (photo from bluffcountrynews.com)

“That’s why we put together a two-day event, starting on June 16th from 2-5 pm,” Cruse said, “Hoffman will be here to do a producer meeting in Rushford and talk about everything from lamb marketing to production management to economics, with a pizza supper at the end.

“A lot of the raising and marketing of sheep is similar to other types of livestock,” Cruse added. “But with sheep, there are a lot of products you can get from them. You can market the wool, the meat, or market them as show animals. There’s a whole range of avenues you could take, and that doesn’t even take into account the organic and grass fed categories that beef is also subject to.”

He said producers would have a chance to visit with both Hoffman and Cruse after the meeting. Then, the attention turns from sheep producers to 4H kids the next day from 8 till noon at the Fillmore County Fairgrounds.

“It’ll be a rotational type of educational event with three or four sessions for the youth,” Cruse said. “Showmanship will be one of the educational sessions as Travis (Hoffman) was also a state judge for sheep. The kids will be allowed to bring one of their own 4H-registered sheep to this event in order to practice showing their sheep, learning to get their feet in the right spot, and how to answer a judge’s questions professionally.”

He said this is a great opportunity for area 4H kids to learn, providing they can get enough people signed up.

Cruse said there are a number of reasons for the growing interest in sheep and goats across the area. First and foremost, there are marketing opportunities for sheep and sheep products, especially in Iowa. There’s also an immigrant population in Rochester and the Twin Cities that prefers both sheep and goat meat.

The other side of it is the animals themselves. They’re much smaller and don’t require as much land to raise, especially for 4H families. Sheep and goats don’t need as much space as a beef cow or larger hog.

“It’s a lot easier to get three or four ewes onto a piece of property than a full-grown dairy steer, for example,” Cruse said. “It’s also easier for the younger children in a farm family to handle the animals too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why FFA and agriculture are the Best Things Ever

By: Talisa Smith

A recent article by PETA described FFA as “lame AF.” Now, I see more and more posts from people who used to be in FFA agreeing with PETA. You folks that changed your mind, I’m betting you only did it because other people did. That means you are not, and never were, a proud FFA member.

Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Talisa Smith. I’m 16 years old, and from Fort Pierre, South Dakota. Right now I’m a sophomore at Stanley County High School. I have been a FFA member for three years now, and I can say I would never go back in time and change my mind about becoming one

I am my chapter’s reporter and am stationed by the flag when we hold meetings. Much as the flag covers the United States of America, I strive to inform every man, woman and child I can that FFA is a national organization. It reaches from the state of Alaska to Puerto Rico, and Maine to Hawaii. I am there to let everyone know what goes on in the chapter. So I’m going to tell you what FFA is to me and what my side of the story is.

Many people have read this article about how we are a lame organization. One thing that most people probably don’t realize is that those pictures they have are entirely out of context. What they said is wrong and they clearly don’t know what they are talking about.

In one point that they made, it states FFA teaches kids to raise animals and send them to the slaughterhouse to have them cut apart while they are still living. Well yes, these animals do die so that people don’t starve. However, the methods that they say they use to put the animals down are wrong.

In a slaughterhouse the animals are put down with a stun gun to the head because it’s painless to the animal and quick. The other way is they are put down is by a gas. To make sure that they are dead, workers will drain the rest of the blood so the animals don’t suffer. Then they are butchered for the meat so that the world can have food.

They had also mentioned that sheep tails are cut off and ears are pierced without using painkillers. Cutting the tails off is a process is called docking and it is for the sheep’s benefit. If we don’t do this, the tails would end up getting dirty and infection is a good possibility. We dock the tails so the sheep can stay healthy and not get sick. They don’t feel anything but a little pinch when they do this.  When we pierce their ears, it’s basically a small hole, just as cows get tags in their ear to tell them apart.

The next allegation is we steal calves away from their mothers. We bottle feed those calves instead of giving them milk from the cow. The milk we get from the cows is not just used for drinking. That is used for all sorts of thing like, cottage cheese, cheese, and ice cream. So if we take away that milk, you are going to take away ice cream. Do that, and you have to tell your kids that you are the reason that they can’t have any more ice cream. Now, to me, that just doesn’t sound right.

FFA and agriculture

Stanley County FFA chapter members volunteer to clean up local emergency vehicles as part of summer camp activities. (Contributed photo)

Another point in the article says that the skills needed to stand up and talk in front of a group are lame, uncool, and have no purpose in the world anymore. The article says people should just stick to their phones. What happens when you want a job and you can’t talk to someone in person? You can’t talk only through texting. I can tell you this: you will not get hired and you will not find a job if you can’t have a decent face-to-face conversation.

The article said it’s cooler to judge people instead of knowing different kinds of livestock and other animals. Well you are now saying that it is ok to belittle people and lower their self-confidence. FFA is trying to stop that in the first place.

FFA and agriculture

Talisa Smith of the Stanley County FFA chapter poses with the Peterson brothers, farmers who are nationally known Ag advocates. They made an appearance at a recent South Dakota State FFA convention. (contributed photo)

They had stated that it is better to be a follower than it is be different and stand up to be a leader. You are going to tell people that it’s better to act and follow someone than to stand up and be yourself? I am proud of who I am and I’m not afraid to stand up and be a leader that may change the world for the better.

Many FFA members take care of animals and know how to feed them and give them the right medicine so they don’t get sick. We want our animals to be the healthiest they can be. We take pride in this because we are feeding the world while doing something that we love to do. Some people are saying that’s dumb. You shouldn’t do that. Instead, be more like PETA and just talk about caring for animals, and not actually doing it. Well if nobody raises livestock, then what happens? We have no food if farmers just stop working. Great: We got everyone to stop like you wanted, but guess what? We have no food for anyone. Now what do you want us to do? We’ll see FFA members and the farmers they might grow up to be as where you’ll get your food from, so we need them.  Did you know that 1 farmer feeds at least 100 people, if not more?

 

FFA and agriculture

National FFA officers often take over local classes to teach life skills all FFA members can use. (contributed photo)

FFA doesn’t just teach you about agriculture. It teaches you life skills that you can use everywhere. You will meet great people along the way that you never would have met in the first place. There are 692,327 members right now, and 7757 chapters in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Those numbers are growing each year and I am so glad for that. Our mission is FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. And our motto is Learning to Do, Doing to Learn, Earning to Live, Living to Serve. As an FFA member I am proud to live by this with everything I’m doing. I don’t think that most people realize is that agriculture is everywhere and is in almost all the jobs that we have.

So the next time someone wants to say that FFA is lame AF and belittle FFA and agriculture, make sure you do some research on it so you know what you’re talking about. You are also offending everyone involved because you information is wrong and hurtful.