Parents: be wary of the new Snapchat update

Snapchat. It’s that new-fangled thing that all the kids are doing, right? But what is it?

Snapchat update

Snapchat is a popular mobile application with kids. A recent update added a locator to find friends anywhere on a map and law enforcement officials are warning parents that it could open up your children’s locations to strangers.

As a parent, you’ve likely heard kids talking about a mobile app called Snapchat but you may not be familiar with what it is. In short, it’s a mobile app that lets users capture short videos or pictures and share them with others for up to 10 seconds before they disappear.

It’s a great way for kids to share what they’re doing with friends, but it’s also a way to share things they don’t want parents seeing. A Forbes.com article noted that stories abound of teenagers “sexting” their friends by sending inappropriate pictures via Snapchat because they hope it disappears on their friends’ devices after 10 seconds It’s important to remember that, in many cases, deleted items can be recovered with the right equipment.

As if that’s not enough for parents to deal with, Snapchat’s newest update involves something that could potentially give away your children’s locations to others, including people you might not want hanging around your children. It’s a map update and parents need to keep an eye on what their children are doing. Law enforcement has taken note, as well.

The Fillmore County Sheriff’s Office wants to alert everyone that Snapchat recently introduced a new tracker in its most current update. This tracker allows you to view the exact location of your friends. It can give you the area, town, street and, if you zoom in enough, it shows the house on the street layout.

Please help share this to make everyone aware because Snapchat has a lot of young users on it. If your children use the application, please check to ensure they have their location set to Ghost mode. That way, no one can see where he or she is. By doing this, it helps keep all Snapchat users, young and older, safer.

I don’t know if you saw this on the map itself, but you can actually access the Snaps from people you don’t know. See the glowing dots on the maps? You may have to zoom in a little bit, but if you tap one of the dots, you’ll access the Snaps of complete strangers. I just saw one of a toddler giggling with an infant sibling, complete with the address here in Rochester. That’s not okay.

How can you change your setting and make Snapchat safer to use? Make sure app is the updated version and go to selfie mode on the camera. Then zoom out by pinching your fingers together. It will give you the option of changing who can see your location.

If you have questions about Snapchat or need help in making this change, feel free to contact the Fillmore County Sheriff’s Office. You can also follow our Facebook page for any updates on this Snapchat issue. Fillmore County Sheriff’s Office cares about the safety and security of our citizens and will continue to alert you to any new developments.

Is the application designed with evil intentions? Of course not. Are all teenagers using it to send illicit pictures? No way. Just make sure you as parents are aware of what’s going on and don’t be afraid to turn on ghost mode for your kids when it comes to Snapchat.

This is a video designed to show parents in more detail how to use the Snapchat map feature and why it could be a security risk to your family members:

 

 

America’s livestock industry fights back against misinformation

Animal rights groups around the nation have gone on attack against livestock production facilities all over the country, and livestock farmers have begun to fight back through social media and direct interaction with consumers.

 

One of the more recent videos put out to the public by the group Mercy for Animals is available on YouTube.  It’s graphic and very offensive in nature:

 

Emily Meredith is the Communications Director for the Animal Agriculture Alliance, and she says what you’re seeing in videos like this isn’t the whole picture.

 

Emily Meredith, Communications Director for the Animal Ag Alliance

Emily Meredith, Communications Director for the Animal Ag Alliance

She said the Animal Ag Alliance is a “non-profit, broad based coalition of everyone in the animal ag food chain.”  The chain includes “farmers, ranchers, producer organizations, and veterinarians.”  She said the goal of the organization is to speak “with a unified voice, to the media and public about top of mind issues, which includes animal rights.”

 

The Alliance feels the real motivation for these videos are more bottom line oriented.  Meredith said “they’re trying to use these videos to fundraise.  They’re also trying to scare the American consumer into believing that their meat and eggs are not being produced humanely, which drives their vegan agenda.”

 

 

Dal Grooms is a spokeswoman for the Iowa Cattleman’s Association, and spoke to Fox News.  She said these activists aren’t in it for the animals benefit.  “Who cares more about the livestock?  The farmers who own it and make sure it’s healthy, or people that kind of stop in for a bit, and then move on to their next victim?  They’re trying to put livestock farmers out of business, and they’re trying to raise money too.”

Livestock farmers are battling back against misinformation

Livestock farmers are battling back against misinformation (Photo by Chad Smith)

 

Meredith said the food production chain has checks and balances in place to ensure that animals are treated humanely.  “There are animal welfare programs in place in each sector of the livestock industry, and buyers want to insure that farmers are following these guidelines.  If farmers are abusing animals, they’re not going to stay in business long because no one will buy product from them.”

Livestock of all kinds have come under scrutiny of undercover videos (photo by Chad Smith)

Livestock of all kinds have come under scrutiny of undercover videos (photo by Chad Smith)

 

According to msn.com, “the meat and poultry industries have begun to push back against animal activists by trying to get bills passed against shooting undercover video in production facilities.”  Humane Society of the USA California Director Jennifer Fearing said, “I wish the cattlemen actually wanted to stop the cruelty instead of the documenting of cruelty.”  Meredith said there’s more to it than that:

 

 

Meredith said farmers haven’t been vigilant in following sound hiring practices when they look for help around the farm. “They’re farmers, not private investigators,” she said. “A lot of these families haven’t been following up and checking references, so they end up hiring someone who’s seeking to destroy their way of life.”

 

The hog industry has borne the brunt of recent undercover videos (photo courtesy of www.national post.com)

The hog industry has borne the brunt of recent undercover videos (photo courtesy of www.national post.com)

“At the Alliance, we’ve encouraged farmers to do your diligence.  Check references.  Make people apply for work in writing, don’t just hire on a handshake,” said Meredith.  “A lot of farmers now make employees sign agreements that if they see abuse, they’ll report it immediately to the owner or to the authorities.

 

Meredith said there are signs that can help a farmer determine if a worker is there for hidden purposes.  “This person will be in areas they’re not supposed to be in.  They’ll be on the farm after hours in some way.  There may be complaints from other workers that they aren’t following proper procedures,” she said.  “In most cases, when the farmer starts asking questions, that activist is gone.”